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Category: Garry Kasparov

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Chess: Garry Kasparov to make cameo comeback when Grand Tour resumes

The 58-year-old will play several of the current elite grandmasters at the over-the-board event in Zagreb, CroatiaGarry Kasparov, now aged 58 and for many still the all-time No 1 player, will make a rare cameo comeback next month when the 2021 over-the…

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Garry Kasparov: ‘Why become a martyr? I can do much more outside Russia’

The chess grandmaster on speaking out against Vladimir Putin and why he cannot choose the best player ever“I haven’t stopped my fight against the regime,” says Garry Kasparov, his words bristling with defiance and quiet rage. “I’m not lowering my voice…

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Chess: Garry Kasparov and Magnus Carlsen meet in historic encounter

America’s world No 2, Fabiano Caruana, the random specialist Wesley So, and the teenage star Alireza Firouzja, could spoil the first meeting of Kasparov and Carlsen since 2004Garry Kasparov and Magnus Carlsen take centre stage this weekend when the all…

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Chess: Garry Kasparov and Magnus Carlsen to meet for first time in 16 years

Kasparov, 57, and Carlsen, 30, will compete at random chess in the 10-player St Louis Champions Showdown, their first encounter since 2004Garry Kasparov will make a rare cameo appearance when the legend, now aged 57, takes on the reigning champion, Mag…

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Garry Kasparov to take part in online Nations Cup chess tournament

Six teams of four players will compete for the prizeFast-rising Alireza Firouzja also among those taking partThe former world champion Garry Kasparov will be among the competitors in an online Nations Cup, a new chess competition featuring six teams of…

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Chess: age catches up with Garry Kasparov in 5-1 loss to Fabiano Caruana

The 56-year-old struggled with fast time limits in the Champions Showdown at St Louis and said afterwards: ‘I can fight all opponents, but not age’Garry Kasparov, world champion for 15 years and still the all-time No 1 in the eyes of many chess fans, l…

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‘Creative’ AlphaZero leads way for chess computers and, maybe, science | Sean Ingle

Former chess world champion Garry Kasparov likes what he sees of computer that could be used to find cures for diseasesGarry Kasparov is not only humanity’s greatest ever chess player but its highest-profile victim of artificial intelligence. His loss …

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The 54-year-old Kasparov took time to get going but his appearance at St Louis still overhadowed Aronian’s three-point margin of victory at the tournament

Winning a top tournament by a three-point margin normally captures the headlines but Levon Aronian’s impressive result at the St Louis speed event last week was sweepingly upstaged by Garry Kasparov’s return to competitive play after a 12-year absence.

This one-off comeback by the 54-year-old, whom many regard as the all-time No1 ahead of Bobby Fischer and Magnus Carlsen, sparked a tidal wave of interest, with six-figure internet audiences reportedly watching the live video. It was gripping stuff, too, as Kasparov showed his old skills with deep strategic plans yet for most of the event simply could not or would not handle his clock time sensibly. He took 22 minutes to his opponent’s four in a 25-minute rapid game, and spent two of his five minutes for blitz on a single move. He was often down to a few seconds at the end of his games.

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Sergey Karjakin in war of words with Garry Kasparov after world chess defeat

After Sergey Karjakin v Magnus Carlsen, the next bout was Karjakin v Garry Kasparov in a sharp war of words. The legend and former world champion Kasparov, defeated in his bid for president of the global chess body, Fide, lives in New York but did not …

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Magnus Carlsen has record rating but is not as dominant as Bobby Fischer

Bobby Fischer never achieved 2800, the super-elite rating for the very strongest grandmasters. At his 1972 peak during his match with Boris Spassky at Reykjavik Fischer reached 2785, which reflected his record run of 20 consecutive games won and put hi…

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Magnus Carlsen has record rating but is not as dominant as Bobby Fischer

Bobby Fischer never achieved 2800, the super-elite rating for the very strongest grandmasters. At his 1972 peak during his match with Boris Spassky at Reykjavik Fischer reached 2785, which reflected his record run of 20 consecutive games won and put hi…

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The chess toilet scandal shows cheating isn’t black-and-white

Gaioz Nigalidze’s disgrace for appearing to use a chess program in the Dubai Open reveals the merciless pressure on lower-ranking professionals

The case of Gaioz Nigalidze, the 25-year-old Georgian chess champion being excoriated as a cheat for having allegedly hidden a mobile phone with a chess program in a lavatory while playing in the Dubai Open, is a peculiar one. On the surface, it’s an open-and-shut case: his opponent, Tigran Petrosian (named after the former Soviet world chess champion), became suspicious about Nigalidze’s frequent trips to the toilet, expressed his concerns to the arbiter, the toilet was searched, and the mobile unearthed, apparently rather crudely hidden under toilet paper.

Nigalidze was defaulted, is now being lambasted around the world – Nigel Short, the English grandmaster who challenged Garry Kasparov for the world title in 1993, is calling for him to be stripped of his grandmaster title – and is facing a 15-year ban from the sport.

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The chess toilet scandal shows cheating isn’t black-and-white

Gaioz Nigalidze’s disgrace for appearing to use a chess program in the Dubai Open reveals the merciless pressure on lower-ranking professionals

The case of Gaioz Nigalidze, the 25-year-old Georgian chess champion being excoriated as a cheat for having allegedly hidden a mobile phone with a chess program in a lavatory while playing in the Dubai Open, is a peculiar one. On the surface, it’s an open-and-shut case: his opponent, Tigran Petrosian (named after the former Soviet world chess champion), became suspicious about Nigalidze’s frequent trips to the toilet, expressed his concerns to the arbiter, the toilet was searched, and the mobile unearthed, apparently rather crudely hidden under toilet paper.

Nigalidze was defaulted, is now being lambasted around the world – Nigel Short, the English grandmaster who challenged Garry Kasparov for the world title in 1993, is calling for him to be stripped of his grandmaster title – and is facing a 15-year ban from the sport.

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Kasparov rejoins rank and file after failed bid to head chess federation

Former world champion’s western backers despair as Kirsan Ilyumzhinov’s 19-year presidency of Fide is further extended Continue reading…

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England in the running as Tromso Olympiad provides plenty of surprises

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Chess champion Garry Kasparov granted Croatian citizenship

Kasparov, now a human rights activist, offered citizenship after struggling to live in Russia as pro-democracy activist

Former world chess champion turned human rights activist Garry Kasparov has been granted Croatian citizenship after finding it increasingly difficult to live in Russia as a pro-democracy campaigner.

Kasparov, 50, has spent many summer holidays at a house he owns in the southern Croatian town of Makarska and he speaks the language. He is also a member of the chess club in the eastern town of Vukovar, which he has played for in the past.

Kasparov achieved international fame in 1985 when he became the world’s youngest world chess champion at 22, beating Anatoly Karpov in Moscow. He went on to hold the No 1 spot as the world’s best chess player until he retired in 2005.

Born in Baku, Azerbaijan, in 1963 when the country was still part of the USSR, the chess grandmaster is known for his outspoken political opposition to the Russian president.

A Croatian chess player close to Kasparov has revealed he applied for Croatian citizenship earlier in February “because of problems he experiences in Russia due to opposing the policy of Vladimir Putin”.

Founder and chairman of pro-democracy organisation United Civil Front, Kasparov has been a figurehead in opposition to Putin’s government. When standing outside the court in Moscow where members of the protest band Pussy Riot were being sentenced in 2012, Kasparov was arrested and beaten by police. He also spent five days in a Russian jail after he co-led an opposition march against Putin in Moscow in 2007.

His application for citizenship received support from politicians and organisations within Croatia. After they met in January, the Croatian president, Ivo Josipović, praised Kasparov for providing “great moral support to Croatia” during the country’s war of independence between 1991-95. Kasparov is widely perceived in the country as having been a vocal supporter of Croatian independence. The Croatian war veterans’ association has encouraged issuing him a passport.

Kasparov and Josipović also played a game of chess together, after which the president boasted on social media that he held the grandmaster off for 33 moves.

This week in the Croatian holiday town of Opatija, Kasparov discussed the idea of launching a local chess club with the minister of education and sports, leading to speculation in local media that he might settle in the town now that he has citizenship.

In a letter published in Croatian media, Kasparov also spoke of his desire to represent Croatia if he decides to run for presidency of the World Chess Federation (Fide) in 2014, as is widely expected.

The news of his Croatian passport follows an earlier request for citizenship in Latvia last year, which he said at the time would help him to feel more secure as he pursued political activities in Russia. The Latvian government announced in November it would not grant him citizenship owing to “procedural issues”.

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