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Category: World Cup 2022

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A radical idea: hold an auction to decide the World Cup hosts to stop corruption | Sean Ingle

In six weeks’ time Fifa will decide the 2026 hosts. But the voting process is more transparent this time round, only an auction would truly end the risk of corruption You can bet on anything these days. Crossfit. Portuguese futsal. Even ByuL versus Rog…

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Qatar’s World Cup, Pep Guardiola and the right to wear a yellow ribbon | Letters

Eddie Hapgood’s daugher Lynne Hapgood on the story behind the 1938 Berlin salute. Plus Justin Horton and John Clark on the Manchester City manager’s affiliationsRichard Williams (Ribbons and salutes, Sport, 27 February) is right in asserting that “hist…

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Qatar stadium where UK worker died was ‘downright dangerous’

British coroner says Zac Cox given substandard equipment by managers at World Cup venueThe only western construction worker killed in the building of World Cup stadiums in Qatar was provided with substandard equipment by managers who should have known …

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How does Pep Guardiola feel about his ambassador role for Qatar World Cup? | Richard Williams

Manchester City manager’s yellow-ribbon display of political affiliation sits uncomfortably with a readiness to front for QatarAs they consider the case of Pep Guardiola, who won his first medal in English football at Wembley on Sunday while semi-surre…

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Greg Clarke’s FA charm offensive in Qatar: what could possibly go right? | Barry Glendenning

The FA chairman’s trip to the 2022 World Cup host as part of a global charm offensive has left him on dubious moral groundGiven Greg Clarke’s track record in the field of diplomatic relations, the obvious question to ask upon learning the Football Asso…

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England friendlies with Qatar on cards after FA agrees partnership

• ‘Memorandum of understanding’ to ‘share knowledge’ with Qatar FA • FA chairman Greg Clarke signs deal with 2022 World Cup hostsThe Football Association has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Qatar Football Association ahead of the Gulf Sta…

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2022 World Cup migrant workers ‘systematically’ exploited, Amnesty say

• Research points to Qatar stadium workers ‘trapped’ in vicious cycle of debt, • ‘Nepali migrant workers are being systematically and mercilessly set up’Migrant workers constructing stadiums for the Qatar 2022 World Cup continue to be trapped in a vici…

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Fifa trial: Qataris were in talks for company caught up in alleged bribery scheme

PSG chairman Nasser al-Khelaifi backed out of deal after indictmentsDetails come up during trial of former football officials in New YorkNasser al-Khelaifi, the chairman of a powerful Qatari sports investment company that owns Paris Saint-Germain, was …

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Qatar World Cup bosses offer no explanation for British worker’s death

Zac Cox’s relatives have waited 10 months for official account of why he died in accident at Khalifa stadiumA 10-month effort to find out how a Briton was killed while building Qatar’s Khalifa stadium for the World Cup has been met with a wall of silen…

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Qatar World Cup workers’ rights to improve with end of kafala system, claims union

• System described as modern slavery by trade union body• News greeted cautiously by expert on migrant workers’ issues in the GulfThe International Trade Union Confederation claims to have secured the agreement of the government in Qatar to significant…

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Fifa’s World Cup money-grabbing may be running into the sand in Qatar | Marina Hyde

Our heroes’ formula of leaving with all the cash and paying no tax could be coming awry in the Middle East as a Dubai official suggests Qatar should give up the World Cup

Exciting territory for the Middle East ingenues at Fifa, as the Qatar World Cup is elevated to the status of geopolitical bargaining chip. I know! It’ll be hard to know whether to qualify for it or sign a triple entente in the hope it’ll see us through the group stage.

But first, a recap. Back in June, several countries in the region – including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Egypt – instituted a blockade of Qatar, severing diplomatic relations and cutting off trade routes and so on. This, they said, was a response to the country’s support for terrorism and closeness to Iran. Among their various demands was that Qatar shut down the Doha‑based al-Jazeera and align itself far more tightly with other Gulf countries. Eye‑catchingly, Dubai’s high-profile security chief has now upped the stakes and claimed the blockade would end if Qatar gave up the World Cup. “If the World Cup leaves Qatar,” reasoned Lt Gen Dhahi Khalfan last Sunday, “Qatar’s crisis will be over … because the crisis is created to get away from it.”

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Wannabe footballers toiling for Qatar 2022 are required viewing | Barry Glendenning

Adam Sobel’s documentary about an annual football championship organised for overseas workers in Qatari migrant labour camps puts a human face on the misery involved in laying the foundations for the World Cup after next

A football team indefinitely cloistered and bored. Often unhappy players pondering the futility of it all. High hopes dashed by the crushing disappointment of exiting a tournament on penalties. Many are the parallels that can be drawn between the team of amateurs featured in The Workers Cup and England football sides of yore, but for all the similarities between these enthusiastic players and their professional counterparts, the modern-day slaves featured in Adam Sobel’s documentary about an annual football championship organised for foreign workers in Qatari migrant labour camps could scarcely be further removed.

Housed in the spartan surrounds of the Umm Salal camp, home to more than 7,000 workers from India, Bangladesh, the Philippines, Nepal and Africa, they are among the poorest workers in the world, labouring in its richest country. The myriad hardships these workers are forced to endure on a daily basis have been well documented as they go about the back-breaking, and often deadly, business of building the infrastructure Qatar requires to stage the 2022 World Cup. They work long hours in dangerous, sweltering, dust‑choked conditions for as little as $200 a month.

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Thousands of Qatar World Cup workers ‘subject to life-threatening heat’

• Human Rights Watch says hundreds of workers dying every year
• Statutory work breaks in summer midday hours not sufficient

Many thousands of migrant workers on construction sites in Qatar, including those building stadiums for the 2022 World Cup, are being subjected to potentially life-threatening heat and humidity, according to new research on the extreme summer conditions in the Gulf. Hundreds of workers are dying every year, the campaign group Human Rights Watch (HRW) has said in a strong statement, but they claim that the Qatar authorities have refused to make necessary information public or adequately investigate the deaths, which could be caused by labouring in the region’s fierce climate.

HRW argues that millions of workers are in jeopardy, including those in the other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries – Bahrain, Oman, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates – because statutory work breaks imposed during summer midday hours do not protect them sufficiently. An analysis of the weather in Doha last summer has also shown that workers on World Cup construction projects were in danger, despite the more advanced system used by the tournament organiser, Humidex, which measures safety levels of heat and humidity.

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Fifa lets Qatar 2022 sail on, its moral lines in the sand still on the horizon | Marina Hyde

War fears, deaths, slavery … the main lesson of the Garcia report appears to be that there is no conceivable dealbreaker that could derail Qatar’s World Cup

Thanks to the long overdue publication of the Garcia report into the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, we now know that England’s efforts to secure the 2018 tournament amounted to “a form of bribery”. Obviously, the only thing less surprising than the fact that England break the rules is how bad they are at it. If an England bid team ever gets within 30 sniffs of actually winning a World Cup bid again, no effort should be spared in investigating how they do business. They are, in the words of pursed-lips grandmas, no better than they should be.

For now, however, England remain as likely to win a World Cup bid as they do to win a World Cup, and we must turn our thoughts to more pressing questions raised by the report by Fifa’s then chief ethics investigator. Namely – and I don’t mean any disrespect to the emir and his accidental vagina stadium – is the Qatar World Cup a thought experiment?

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Fifa’s secret report into World Cup 2018 and 2022 bidding to be leaked

• Report by Michael Garcia was written in 2014 but never published
• German newspaper Bild set to publish first parts on Tuesday

Qatar’s successful bid for the 2022 World Cup looks set to become mired in fresh controversy after the leaking of a secret Fifa report into the 2010 bidding contests.

That highly controversial process saw Russia beat several European bids, including England’s, to win the right to host the 2018 World Cup and the wealthy Gulf state overcome the likes of the United States for 2022.

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2022 World Cup in Qatar under threat as Saudi Arabia joins blockade

• Saudis, UAE and Bahrain close land route, deny airspace over ‘terror’ claims
• Fifa, now sponsored by Qatar Airways, decline to comment

The prospect of Qatar hosting the 2022 World Cup has been plunged into the most serious doubt after the country’s neighbours broke off diplomatic relations and blockaded its borders. In a culmination of hostilities simmering for years and accusations that Qatar is a major funder of terrorist organisations, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain have closed the only land route into the tiny peninsula and refused to allow use of their sea ports or airspace.

The multibillion-dollar preparations to host the 2022 tournament, which involve building nine stadiums and huge infrastructure, is put into perspective by local reports that Qataris are so worried about the blockade that they are stocking up on food. The border with Saudi Arabia is the only road route into the country; Qatar relies on sea ports for its materials and the blockade of airspace is a huge logistical handicap to the country and its flagship airline, Qatar Airways.

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Fifa votes overwhelmingly to fast-track 2026 World Cup bid process

  • Decision to determine 2026 host will now take place on 13 June 2018
  • Other countries have until 11 August to express interest in hosting
  • Infrastructure makes joint bid by USA, Mexico and Canada the favorite

Fifa have approved a fast-tracked bidding process to determine the host for the 2026 World Cup, with 93% of the 209 members voting on Thursday in favor of the decision at the governing body’s congress in Bahrain.

Other countries have until 11 August to express interest in hosting the World Cup and must meet a list of Fifa’s technical specifications by March 2018. The decision to select any bidders will take place on 13 June 2018.

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France investigates votes for 2018 and 2022 World Cups and questions Blatter

• Fifa’s former president interviewed as Swiss authorities co-operate
• Michel Platini, Uefa’s former president, has not been spoken to

French prosecutors have opened an investigation into potential corruption relating to Fifa’s vote for Russia and Qatar to host respectively the 2018 and 2022 World Cup finals, sources close to the investigation have confirmed.

Investigators are understood to have interviewed Sepp Blatter, who was the Fifa president at the time of the controversial December 2010 vote by a majority of the executive committee. Michel Platini, the former Uefa president whose decision to cast his vote for Qatar was crucial to the Gulf state winning a majority vote, has not been interviewed, the sources said.

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Qatar spending $500m a week on World Cup projects

Country’s finance minister says the rate of spend could continue for the next four years to get country ready for tournament

High-spending World Cup 2022 hosts Qatar are laying out almost $500m every week on major infrastructure projects for football’s biggest tournament, the country’s finance minister said.

That eye-watering level of spending could continue until 2021, Ali Shareef Al-Emadi said on Tuesday.

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Qatar spending $500m a week on World Cup projects

Country’s finance minister says the rate of spend could continue for the next four years to get country ready for tournament

High-spending World Cup 2022 hosts Qatar are laying out almost $500m every week on major infrastructure projects for football’s biggest tournament, the country’s finance minister said.

That eye-watering level of spending could continue until 2021, Ali Shareef Al-Emadi said on Tuesday.

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