rss

Category: Women’s cricket

0

Women’s cricket ‘likely to be a target’ for corruption, insiders fear

• Betting on women’s game has mushroomed in past year
• ‘There is no global education programme’ says players’ association leader

Senior figures in world cricket have warned of the growing threat of corruption within the “vulnerable” women’s game, with an explosion in interest making it more attractive to fixers.

The warnings come in the wake of a successful World Cup and as England prepare in Australia for the Women’s Ashes, which begins on 22 October. Tony Irish, the chief executive of international cricket’s players’ association warned that the women’s game was particularly at risk.

Continue reading…

0

Australians confident of retaining Ashes despite losing Meg Lanning

  • Rachael Haynes will stand in as captain with Lanning out injured
  • Six rookies were named in the 15-player squad

Australia’s batters have declared they have the depth required to cover the loss of injured captain Meg Lanning in the upcoming women’s Ashes series.

Selectors have named almost identical squads for the four one-dayers and one-off Test match against England, which the world’s top-ranked batter Lanning will miss due to a shoulder injury.

Continue reading…

0

Australians confident of retaining Ashes despite losing Meg Lanning

  • Rachael Haynes will stand in as captain with Lanning out injured
  • Six rookies were named in the 15-player squad

Australia’s batters have declared they have the depth required to cover the loss of injured captain Meg Lanning in the upcoming women’s Ashes series.

Selectors have named almost identical squads for the four one-dayers and one-off Test match against England, which the world’s top-ranked batter Lanning will miss due to a shoulder injury.

Continue reading…

0

England Women call up Lancashire’s Sophie Ecclestone for Ashes series

• Young spinner adds to bowling options in Heather Knight’s squad
• ‘Ashes tours don’t come around too often so it’s always a special opportunity’

England Women have announced their squad of 15 for the upcoming Ashes series, with the left-arm off-spinner Sophie Ecclestone the only change from the group that won the World Cup this summer.

The right-arm seamer Beth Langston makes way for the 18-year-old, who made her international debut last summer aged 17, with two ODIs and two T20s against Pakistan, with three wickets in each format. Ecclestone missed last winter’s tour of Sri Lanka because of school commitments but will provide the captain, Heather Knight, with a taller option on harder Australian pitches, alongside England’s numerous other spin options.

Continue reading…

0

Charlotte Edwards retires after Southern Vipers final defeat by Western Storm

• Southern Vipers 145-5; Western Storm 151-3 (Storm win by 7 wkts)
• England star says Kia Super League final was last game at this level

Western Storm have won the second edition of the Kia Super League, beating defending champions Southern Vipers by seven wickets – and at the game’s conclusion, the defeated captain, Charlotte Edwards, confirmed her retirement from professional cricket.

Edwards is England’s most capped player, playing 23 Tests, 191 one-day internationals and 95 T20s across 20 years, the last 10 of which as captain. In the final, her 20 off eight balls helped the Vipers to a score of 145 for five.

Continue reading…

0

Australia’s Ashes hopes dealt blow with Meg Lanning ruled out through injury

  • Captain to miss eight months after undergoing shoulder surgery
  • Unclear who will lead Australia in multi-format series against England

Australia have suffered a huge blow to their women’s cricket Ashes chances, with captain and star batter Meg Lanning ruled out. The 25-year-old will miss up to the next eight months after having surgery to the shoulder which caused her problems during the recent World Cup.

Related: Jodie Fields hails cricketers’ record pay deal as ‘huge step’ for women’s game

Continue reading…

0

Heather Knight: ‘I was panicked. I thought I’d lost the World Cup’

England captain Heather Knight has had a whirlwind few weeks since winning the World Cup at Lord’s, including mislaying the trophy on a visit to The Oval

A few days after lifting the Women’s World Cup and following endless press commitments carried out with a beaming smile and a well-deserved headache, the England captain Heather Knight was in her civvies, minding her own business at London Euston. As fate would have it, the big screen in the station replayed the last moments of the final, when Anya Shrubsole yorked Rajeshwari Gayakwad to win it. Barring a few clips online, she had not relived the drama of the nine-run win over India.

“I tried to get my head down,” says Knight. “But a few people stopped me and were like: ‘Oh my god, that’s you!’ It’s quite weird, really, and a little bit uncomfortable. But I guess that comes with what happened that Sunday at Lord’s.”

Continue reading…

0

Jodie Fields hails cricketers’ record pay deal as ‘huge step’ for women’s game

  • Fields says deal ‘will ensure cricket attracts young girls to our sport’
  • Basic pay for women internationals to rise 119% over five years

Australia’s former World Cup-winning captain Jodie Fields has welcomed cricket’s new pay deal, bringing the biggest rise in salaries in the history of women’s sport in Australia, as a “huge step” for the game.

The renewed memorandum of understanding (MOU) for Australian cricketers, secured under an in-principle agreement between Cricket Australia and the Australian Cricketers’ Association, includes men and women in the same agreement for the first time.

Continue reading…

0

Ashes saved as peace deal is brokered in Australian cricket pay dispute

  • In principle agreement brings an end to months of uncertainty
  • Details of new deal to be announced on Thursday

The bitter pay dispute that has played out so acrimoniously in public and threatened to derail the Australian summer of cricket, including the Ashes series, has ended with a peace deal between Cricket Australia and the players’ union reportedly brokered.

CA and the Australian Cricketers’ Association reached agreement on Thursday, having been bunkered down in intensive negotiations since Sunday, to ensure the showpiece event against England will take place as planned, as well as preceding men’s tours to Bangladesh and India.

Continue reading…

0

Clare Connor says cricket must seize initiative after World Cup success

• ICC member also calls on the sport to expand women’s game in India
• ‘Tournament is building a bigger and stronger business case for women’s game’

In the afterglow of the World Cup triumph the England and Wales Cricket Board director of women’s cricket, Clare Connor, has called on the sport to seize the moment, grab sponsor opportunities and expand the game in India.

“It was an unbelievably special day but it’s what you do next,” she said. “Take track cycling. During th’e Olympics, everyone loves it. Millions are watching but don’t know what is going on in the intervening years. We can’t let that happen.”

Continue reading…

0

Cricket is on the verge of making its application for Olympic inclusion

The approval of India is needed before a bid can be put forward but Olympic status would help the sport’s image become more global and less colonial

For all that the Olympic Games has become a byword for corruption and greed, it is challenged by only the football World Cup in terms of global popularity. Inclusion brings exposure to new audiences and opens up cash from national governments and the International Olympic Committee itself. That is why rugby and golf rejoined in Rio last year and the World Squash Federation president was “heartbroken” to learn that squash would not feature in 2020.

Cricket has long been unique among major sports in its reticence about joining the Olympic Games: an oddity that speaks of the sport’s conservatism and the historic lack of concern of its largest members for increasing the sport’s global footprint.

Continue reading…

0

England Women’s World Cup triumph should transform fortunes of the players

• Exposure from victory could lead to advertising and sponsorship deals
• Win described as ‘watershed moment’ by Anya Shrubsole and Clare Connor

The lives of England’s World Cup-winning team and future generations of female cricketers will be transformed by the victory, according to leading agents and sport marketing experts.

Anya Shrubsole, whose incredible bowling turned almost certain defeat into victory against India, said it felt like a “watershed moment” for the sport played out before a capacity crowd at Lord’s. The £512,000 prize-money has been split equally among the 15-strong squad, meaning £34,000 a player. For players on central contracts worth around £50,000 plus match fees and bonuses, that represents a huge increase in their annual income.

Continue reading…

0

Anya Shrubsole: ‘It is quite hard to remember everything that happened’

England’s hero from the Women’s World Cup final victory over India says she was so focused during the match the scale of her achievement took time to sink in

The power of recall among sports people is a peculiar thing. Perhaps it is because their work relies on reaction and instinct but many are prone to misremembering their own spectacular feats: forgetting dates, venues or even the details of the performance itself. For example, in cricket, it is common for batsmen looking back on their careers to recall an early breakthrough knock as a century when it may have only been a match-winning 60. Slowly but surely the sands of time scrape away at authentic memory.

During England’s celebrations deep into the London night, after the most miraculous of World Cup wins against India at Lord’s, Anya Shrubsole, player of the match award stuffed in her bag after a match-winning six for 46 (such is her modesty her medal was buried deeper instead of around her neck), was given a piece of advice: to write something down – her feelings, her emotions or simply the thoughts running through her head; to commit to paper a moment that deserves permanency.

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup moves cricket closer to Olympic return in 2024

• Popularity of women’s tournament has helped sway the ICC and the IOC
• India’s BCCI will meet on Wednesday to discuss its support, seen as vital

The success of the Women’s World Cup won by England on Sunday and watched by millions around the globe has propelled cricket closer to a return to the Olympic Games in 2024. The International Cricket Council is determined to capitalise on recent advances in the women’s game and push on with a bid for Twenty20 competitions, for both genders, to be included. Agreement with the Games is considered closer than ever.

After the World Cup, the ICC recognises how cricket featuring in the Olympics would give the women’s game even greater profile and open up new funding from national governments. There is stronger support for the concept among the ICC’s 104 members than ever before, recognising the opportunity that the Olympics presents.

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup moves cricket closer to Olympic return in 2024

• Popularity of women’s tournament has helped sway the ICC and the IOC
• India’s BCCI will meet on Wednesday to discuss its support, seen as vital

The success of the Women’s World Cup won by England on Sunday and watched by millions around the globe has propelled cricket closer to a return to the Olympic Games in 2024. The International Cricket Council is determined to capitalise on recent advances in the women’s game and push on with a bid for Twenty20 competitions, for both genders, to be included. Agreement with the Games is considered closer than ever.

After the World Cup, the ICC recognises how cricket featuring in the Olympics would give the women’s game even greater profile and open up new funding from national governments. There is stronger support for the concept among the ICC’s 104 members than ever before, recognising the opportunity that the Olympics presents.

Continue reading…

0

England beat India in a thrilling Women’s World Cup final – a photo essay

Photographer Tom Jenkins had exclusive access around Lord’s to capture all the action and atmosphere of a dramatic Women’s World Cup cricket final

This was one of the great Lord’s finals and there was a buzz around St John’s Wood before a ball was bowled. On the Wellington Road the ticket touts were out in force and they seemed more eager to buy than sell. Not even Rachel Heyhoe Flint, one of the world’s great optimists and the captain of England in the first World Cup final in 1973 – they were two years ahead of the men – would have dared to envisage this.

Continue reading…

0

Cricket World Cup win seals trailblazing summer of women’s sport

England’s Heather Knight says victory will be transformative for cricket – with Euro 2017 and rugby World Cup action to come

England captain Heather Knight predicted her team’s historic world cup victory will transform the face of cricket in Britain after a pulsating finale at Lord’s in front of the largest crowd ever to watch a women’s game in this country.

More than 27,000 spectators piled into the home of cricket, many of them women and young girls, to witness one of the most remarkable comebacks ever seen at Lord’s, led by 25-year-old Anya Shrubsole.

Continue reading…

0

England beat India in dramatic Women’s Cricket World Cup final – video

England have won the Women’s Cricket World Cup, beating India by nine runs in a thrilling final which could have gone either way. It took a match-winning spell from Anya Shrubsole, with the bowler taking five wickets for just 11 runs at the end, taking the final wicket with just nine balls remaining

Continue reading…

0

Thrilling England win in World Cup final is a great advert for the game | Vic Marks

After two excellent semi-finals, the climax to the tournament provided more fantastic entertainment with the result in doubt until the last ball

It is the women who know how to enthrall. After two riveting semi‑finals in the World Cup here was a final that had a capacity crowd nervously glued to their seats one moment, then leaping out of them in delight yet still never knowing which side would prevail until the final ball was bowled. Somehow the men’s games this summer have been so disappointingly one-sided by comparison.

This was not the decorous Lord’s of seasons past. The fans were chanting and gasping at every twist and turn. In the final overs each ball provoked raucous cheers from one set of fans or the other. Brilliant run-outs, scrambled singles, desperate dropped catches and then at the end – just as in the semi-final at Bristol – Anya Shrubsole was engulfed by team‑mates, exhausted not so much by the demands of the game, but the tension of a magnificent final. One-day cricket is a wonderful game when the outcome seems all-important.

Continue reading…

0

England v India: Women’s World Cup final – live!

10.37am BST

1st over: England 1-0 (Winfield 1, Beaumont 0) Jhulan Goswami, leading ODI wicket-taker, in her last World Cup, gets us underway from the Nursery End. Lauren Winfield, one part of the Bash ‘Em sisters, lets the first ball go by. The roars are over the top. It’s just a dot ball, lads and lasses. I don’t think they care. A single to third man and England, the crowd and this match are underway…

10.30am BST

Right – come at me with your words. Tweet me with at @Vitu_E or go ahead pass on any longer thoughts to my humungous email address, vithushan.ehantharajah.casual@theguardian.com.

Eileen Whelan was given the honour of ringing the bell for the start of play. She played for England, Middlesex and the Civil Service. She says the two things that keep her fit are yoga and wine. She’s 105. There’s a lesson for all of us…

Continue reading…