rss

Category: Wimbledon 2014

0

Roger Federer thinking not of retirement but eighth Wimbledon title

The seven-times champion claims winning the warm-up event in Halle has given him the confidence needed to win yet another title at Wimbledon

It may not be something Roger Federer or Stan Wawrinka have thought much about, but there is the middling possibility at these championships that they could be the first Wimbledon men’s finalists from the same country since Pete Sampras beat his American compatriot Andre Agassi in 1999.

Federer, owner of 17 majors, seven of them on this grass, is the more favoured of the two Swiss to reach the final, but Wawrinka, who has never got past the quarter-finals, comes buoyed by winning his second grand slam title, the dramatic victory over Novak Djokovic in the French Open this month.

Continue reading…

0

Our favourite things online this week: from Wimbledon views to slam dunks

Featuring Enfield Town’s advertising, the essence of winners, Zach LaVine’s leaps, identical pole vaulters and the Premier League’s reluctance to pay the living wage

Forrest Allen, one of the foremost basketball coaches in the early 20th century, was no fan of the slam dunk. He set out his case for raising the hoop an extra two feet off the ground in an article entitled “Dunking Isn’t Basketball” for Country Gentleman magazine in 1935. “Those tall fellows were leaping at the 10-foot baskets and were literally ‘dunking’ the ball into the hoop, just as a doughnut is inelegantly dipped into the morning coffee,” he wrote, with an air of haughty despair. “And I say that is not basketball. My conception of the game is that goals should be shot and not dunked.”

The Premier League just secured a record breaking £5.14bn by selling the TV rights to their matches. However, these staggeringly wealthy football clubs still pay some of their employees less than the minimum amount needed to cover the cost of living in the UK, which is currently £9.15 per hour in London and £7.85 outside. It would take these staff 13 years to earn as much as some top players earn in a week. Do these clubs seriously expect us to believe that they can’t afford to pay their staff – who provide essential services such as cleaning, catering and stewarding – the basic amount needed to ensure a decent quality of life for them and their families? The chief executive of the Premier League, Richard Scudamore, recently indicated that he had no intention of taking action to make sure that clubs distribute their wealth equally amongst all those that make football matches possible. I am calling on Scudamore to change his mind about clubs’ obligations to their employees. I am asking him to take the lead on this issue by making the Premier League an accredited Living Wage employer and set an example to the 20 other clubs.

Elite athletes, at their telescoped apex, all have something in common with the way in which he whittled away everything in his being that might have distracted from the narrow scope of winning. There are no leisure activities for someone with these priorities; there is no leisure, period. If this does not seem like a club to which you’d like to belong, congratulations: you are not Arnold Palmer, or Michael Jordan, or Kobe Bryant, or Serena Williams, or Lance Armstrong. It’s not unusual for humans to hate losing, and there are plenty of athletes (and non-athletes) that value winning above anything else on earth. But while many and maybe most professional athletes fit those categories, there are others whose entire essences are signified by the idea of winning things, more things than everyone else.

“Just be original. I get guys sending folios and they look like they’ve just seen the back of a Sunday newspaper and thought ‘that’s what’s required’. If that’s what they get from their contracted agency, you’ve got to break out, you’ve got to get something that makes people think twice. If you’re mad on football and you think you’ve got a knowledge of the game, then you’ll get good pictures. But do it your way.”

This. pic.twitter.com/0XChWVofRz

Continue reading…

0

Tom Jenkins’s best sports photos of 2014 – in pictures

The Guardian and Observer sport photographer Tom Jenkins selects his best images from 2014 and recalls in detail how each one was created Continue reading…

0

Our favourite things online this week: from Wimbledon views to slam dunks

Featuring Enfield Town’s advertising, the essence of winners, Zach LaVine’s leaps, identical pole vaulters and the Premier League’s reluctance to pay the living wage

Forrest Allen, one of the foremost basketball coaches in the early 20th century, was no fan of the slam dunk. He set out his case for raising the hoop an extra two feet off the ground in an article entitled “Dunking Isn’t Basketball” for Country Gentleman magazine in 1935. “Those tall fellows were leaping at the 10-foot baskets and were literally ‘dunking’ the ball into the hoop, just as a doughnut is inelegantly dipped into the morning coffee,” he wrote, with an air of haughty despair. “And I say that is not basketball. My conception of the game is that goals should be shot and not dunked.”

The Premier League just secured a record breaking £5.14bn by selling the TV rights to their matches. However, these staggeringly wealthy football clubs still pay some of their employees less than the minimum amount needed to cover the cost of living in the UK, which is currently £9.15 per hour in London and £7.85 outside. It would take these staff 13 years to earn as much as some top players earn in a week. Do these clubs seriously expect us to believe that they can’t afford to pay their staff – who provide essential services such as cleaning, catering and stewarding – the basic amount needed to ensure a decent quality of life for them and their families? The chief executive of the Premier League, Richard Scudamore, recently indicated that he had no intention of taking action to make sure that clubs distribute their wealth equally amongst all those that make football matches possible. I am calling on Scudamore to change his mind about clubs’ obligations to their employees. I am asking him to take the lead on this issue by making the Premier League an accredited Living Wage employer and set an example to the 20 other clubs.

Elite athletes, at their telescoped apex, all have something in common with the way in which he whittled away everything in his being that might have distracted from the narrow scope of winning. There are no leisure activities for someone with these priorities; there is no leisure, period. If this does not seem like a club to which you’d like to belong, congratulations: you are not Arnold Palmer, or Michael Jordan, or Kobe Bryant, or Serena Williams, or Lance Armstrong. It’s not unusual for humans to hate losing, and there are plenty of athletes (and non-athletes) that value winning above anything else on earth. But while many and maybe most professional athletes fit those categories, there are others whose entire essences are signified by the idea of winning things, more things than everyone else.

“Just be original. I get guys sending folios and they look like they’ve just seen the back of a Sunday newspaper and thought ‘that’s what’s required’. If that’s what they get from their contracted agency, you’ve got to break out, you’ve got to get something that makes people think twice. If you’re mad on football and you think you’ve got a knowledge of the game, then you’ll get good pictures. But do it your way.”

This. pic.twitter.com/0XChWVofRz

Continue reading…

0

Our favourite things online this week: from Wimbledon views to slam dunks

Featuring Enfield Town’s advertising, the essence of winners, Zach LaVine’s leaps, identical pole vaulters and the Premier League’s reluctance to pay the living wage

Forrest Allen, one of the foremost basketball coaches in the early 20th century, was no fan of the slam dunk. He set out his case for raising the hoop an extra two feet off the ground in an article entitled “Dunking Isn’t Basketball” for Country Gentleman magazine in 1935. “Those tall fellows were leaping at the 10-foot baskets and were literally ‘dunking’ the ball into the hoop, just as a doughnut is inelegantly dipped into the morning coffee,” he wrote, with an air of haughty despair. “And I say that is not basketball. My conception of the game is that goals should be shot and not dunked.”

The Premier League just secured a record breaking £5.14bn by selling the TV rights to their matches. However, these staggeringly wealthy football clubs still pay some of their employees less than the minimum amount needed to cover the cost of living in the UK, which is currently £9.15 per hour in London and £7.85 outside. It would take these staff 13 years to earn as much as some top players earn in a week. Do these clubs seriously expect us to believe that they can’t afford to pay their staff – who provide essential services such as cleaning, catering and stewarding – the basic amount needed to ensure a decent quality of life for them and their families? The chief executive of the Premier League, Richard Scudamore, recently indicated that he had no intention of taking action to make sure that clubs distribute their wealth equally amongst all those that make football matches possible. I am calling on Scudamore to change his mind about clubs’ obligations to their employees. I am asking him to take the lead on this issue by making the Premier League an accredited Living Wage employer and set an example to the 20 other clubs.

Elite athletes, at their telescoped apex, all have something in common with the way in which he whittled away everything in his being that might have distracted from the narrow scope of winning. There are no leisure activities for someone with these priorities; there is no leisure, period. If this does not seem like a club to which you’d like to belong, congratulations: you are not Arnold Palmer, or Michael Jordan, or Kobe Bryant, or Serena Williams, or Lance Armstrong. It’s not unusual for humans to hate losing, and there are plenty of athletes (and non-athletes) that value winning above anything else on earth. But while many and maybe most professional athletes fit those categories, there are others whose entire essences are signified by the idea of winning things, more things than everyone else.

“Just be original. I get guys sending folios and they look like they’ve just seen the back of a Sunday newspaper and thought ‘that’s what’s required’. If that’s what they get from their contracted agency, you’ve got to break out, you’ve got to get something that makes people think twice. If you’re mad on football and you think you’ve got a knowledge of the game, then you’ll get good pictures. But do it your way.”

This. pic.twitter.com/0XChWVofRz

Continue reading…

0

Nick Kyrgios: I walked out on centre court thinking I could win

The rising Australian tennis star had no doubts about his chances against Rafael Nadal at Wimbledon and harbours hopes of becoming world number one Continue reading…

0

The sports quiz of the week: World Cup, Wimbledon and British Grand Prix

If you watched Germany humiliate Brazil and managed to stay awake through Argentina v Holland you will do well this week Continue reading…

0

In praise of one-time winners

We should define champions like Chris Froome and Andy Murray by their wins not their lossesSo Chris Froome’s withdrawal from the Tour de France is more proof of British sporting misery in 2014, is it? How short memories can be. Mr Froome won the Tour l…

0

In praise of one-time winners

We should define champions like Chris Froome and Andy Murray by their wins not their lossesSo Chris Froome’s withdrawal from the Tour de France is more proof of British sporting misery in 2014, is it? How short memories can be. Mr Froome won the Tour l…

0

Wimbledon champion Novak Djokovic savours joyful period in his career

Life is good as the Serb claims second Wimbledon win, relishes partnership with Boris Becker and looks forward to marriage Continue reading…

0

The 20 best photographs from Wimbledon 2014 in pictures

The Guardian sports picture desk choose their favourite moments and photographs from this year’s Championships Continue reading…

0

Novak Djokovic’s Wimbledon final win against Roger Federer in tweets animation

Twitter’s data team, run by Simon Rogers,
has produced this animated map showing the frequency of geolocated
tweets about Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer during the Wimbledon men’s singles final Who made this? Simon Rogers of Twitter Data Continue …

0

Novak Djokovic’s Wimbledon final win against Roger Federer in tweets animation

Twitter’s data team, run by Simon Rogers,
has produced this animated map showing the frequency of geolocated
tweets about Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer during the Wimbledon men’s singles final Who made this? Simon Rogers of Twitter Data Continue …

0

Wimbledon 2014 review: our writers best players, matches, highs and lows

The Guardians team at this years Championships reflect on superb wins, stunning shocks and the sight of too many chinos Continue reading…

0

Federer won the Wimbledon crowd but Djokovic won the day

Emotions run high as after five-set thriller that captivated Centre Court and sees Djokovic crowned world number oneAs a student of sporting history, Roger Federer knows about the improbable late renaissance of Muhammad Ali. How the greatest boxer succ…

0

Novak Djokovic: Its the best grand slam final I have ever played

Wimbledon champion thrilled at overcoming mental challenge Djokovic admits his poor run in finals was on his mind Continue reading…

0

Novak Djokovic: Its the best grand slam final I have ever played

Wimbledon champion thrilled at overcoming mental challenge Djokovic admits his poor run in finals was on his mindA jubilant Novak Djokovic said his mental strength was the key to winning Wimbledon for a second time, describing his five-set victory ove…

0

Roger Federer v Novak Djokovic  the Wimbledon men’s singles final: in pictures

And so two remained: Novak Djokovic faced Roger Federer in the men’s final at Wimbledon. A vintage match saw the Serbian win a nail-biting five-setter. The Guardian’s Tom Jenkins was courtside to capture the action Continue reading…

0

Solitary teardrop shows how much Wimbledon defeat hurts Roger Federer

The Swiss player admits to ‘unbelievable sadness’ after missing out on an eighth title by losing to Novak Djokovic but brushes away questions about retirement Continue reading…

0

Novak Djokovic wins Wimbledon title after epic duel with Roger Federer

Novak Djokovic wins 6-7, 6-4, 7-6, 5-7, 6-4 Roger Federer fights back but is denied in fifth set Continue reading…