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Category: Peter Moores

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Peter Moores turns sights to treble after Nottinghamshire’s T20 triumph

• Division Two leaders face second-placed Worcestershire from Tuesday
• ‘We work hard and have found a way to deliver when it counts’

“Bloody right I would!” said Peter Moores when asked if he would consider the treble his Nottinghamshire side are two-thirds of the way to completing – after Saturday’s Finals Day triumph – to be “proper”, given that the unfinished business is merely the Division Two title. From Tuesday they host their nearest rivals, Worcestershire, who are 32 points behind. Promotion could be sealed in a hurry.

For Moores this is success at a third county, after ending Sussex’s 164-year wait for a Championship win in 2003 and winning the title with a homegrown Lancashire side in 2011, and the second time he has succeeded after the crushingly disappointing spells as England coach. Lesser characters would have been broken by one of them; Moores has overcome both. Paul Downton’s infamous soundbite – “the outstanding coach of his generation” – was an unbearable weight and merely provided a stick with which to beat Moores. But at domestic level Downton was not remotely incorrect.

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Peter Moores named new head coach at struggling Nottinghamshire

• Former England coach takes up new role at club
• Moores to work with director of cricket Mike Newell

Peter Moores has been appointed the Nottinghamshire head coach, as the club aim to bounce back from a disappointing season. Moores, who had been employed as a coaching consultant at Trent Bridge since July 2015, has been appointed to the newly created position on a three-year deal.

Related: Nottinghamshire hope arrival of Peter Moores will revive lowly county

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Nottinghamshire hope arrival of Peter Moores will revive lowly county

• Nottinghamshire 240 & 115-3; Worcestershire 283
• Mick Newell: there was a need for fresh ideas and voices in dressing room

Peter Moores has been tasked with saving Nottinghamshire from relegation nearly eight weeks after being sacked as the England coach.

The genesis of the eye-catching move for 52-year-old Moores, planned by Mick Newell and Lisa Pursehouse, the club’s director of cricket and chief executive respectively, came during the innings defeat by Yorkshire at Headingley last week that plunged the east Midlands county to the bottom of Division One halfway through the campaign. His arrival as a coaching consultant on a three-month deal was announced in the home dressing room at stumps on the second evening.

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Ex-England coach Peter Moores irked by portrayal as a number cruncher

• Moores more upset at portrayal than the manner of his departure from ECB
• 52-year-old admits role at Loughborough with National Academy appeals

Peter Moores has broken a six-week silence over his sacking as England head coach, claiming his portrayal as being someone obsessed by statistics rankles greater than the manner by which he was dismissed.

Moores saw a second spell in the role terminated on 8 May – the first act in the tenure of the director of England cricket, Andrew Strauss – after a disappointing 13 months of results that culminated in the winter’s failed World Cup campaign in Australia and New Zealand and a 1-1 Test series draw with West Indies.

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England’s tough time could get trickier against strong New Zealand

From the Kevin Pietersen saga to the sacking of Peter Moores – and so much more – England and the ECB have been left looking shambolic. The Kiwis and Australia could make it worse
• Andrew Strauss confirms no recall for Kevin Pietersen
• Kevin Pietersen left devastated by England snub
• Peter Moores to lose England job
• Adam Lyth and Mark Wood in squad to face New Zealand

The English have never much liked referendums even though they appear to be back in favour. Andrew Strauss, in his first outing as cricket director, outlined one of the problems encountered by Peter Moores. “He very quickly got to the stage where every game was a referendum on whether the coach should stay or go,” he said, explaining the decision to sack Moores. The implication was that this burden would somehow disappear along with the departure of the England coach.

Strauss, the ultimate pragmatist, had himself disappeared into a rare flight of fancy – just as he must have done when he came up with the brainwave of inviting Kevin Pietersen to be a one-day cricket adviser even though he was not trustworthy enough to have in the team.

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Andrew Strauss makes mark but ECB’s treatment of Peter Moores is shabby

The outlook was always grim for Peter Moores once Paul Downton was dismissed, but to find out his fate from the media does not reflect well on the ECB
• Strauss named director of cricket as Moores is sacked
• Mike Selvey: Moores tried his best, but World Cup was beginning of the end

Tom Harrison may not be a household name just yet, but the England and Wales Cricket Board’s new chief executive has been sending forlorn employees on their way with a regularity that Lord Sugar might envy. Paul Downton one week, Peter Moores the next: not to mention less well-known and less important figures such as the former head of corporate affairs, Colin Gibson. The new broom at the ECB may need some new bristles surprisingly quickly.

Already the focus is on the new recruits, rather than those on the way out (Peter and Paul Who? Nigel and Nick Who?). Theoretically Andrew Strauss, now installed as “Director, England Cricket”, has been presented with a blank canvas and the opportunity to come in with some mouth-watering replacements. In practice Strauss must have been fully involved in the decision to sack Moores, which was revealed 36 minutes after his own elevation had been confirmed by the ECB.

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Andrew Strauss makes mark but ECB’s treatment of Peter Moores is shabby

The outlook was always grim for Peter Moores once Paul Downton was dismissed, but to find out his fate from the media does not reflect well on the ECB
• Strauss named director of cricket as Moores is sacked
• Mike Selvey: Moores tried his best, but World Cup was beginning of the end

Tom Harrison may not be a household name just yet, but the England and Wales Cricket Board’s new chief executive has been sending forlorn employees on their way with a regularity that Lord Sugar might envy. Paul Downton one week, Peter Moores the next: not to mention less well-known and less important figures such as the former head of corporate affairs, Colin Gibson. The new broom at the ECB may need some new bristles surprisingly quickly.

Already the focus is on the new recruits, rather than those on the way out (Peter and Paul Who? Nigel and Nick Who?). Theoretically Andrew Strauss, now installed as “Director, England Cricket”, has been presented with a blank canvas and the opportunity to come in with some mouth-watering replacements. In practice Strauss must have been fully involved in the decision to sack Moores, which was revealed 36 minutes after his own elevation had been confirmed by the ECB.

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Andrew Strauss gets director of England cricket job as Peter Moores is sacked

• Former captain ‘responsible for long-term strategy’ of England’s senior team
• ‘We’re delighted he’s joining us at the ECB’ says chief executive Tom Harrison

The England and Wales Cricket Board has confirmed Andrew Strauss as director of England cricket and Peter Moores has lost his job as coach.

The former captain Strauss’s appointment has been widely expected and he withdrew from broadcast duties at the one-day international in Dublin on Friday in order to avoid facing awkward questions. The announcement was brought forward ahead of the announcement of Moores’ sacking.

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Andrew Strauss gets director of England cricket job as Peter Moores is sacked

• Former captain ‘responsible for long-term strategy’ of England’s senior team
• ‘We’re delighted he’s joining us at the ECB’ says chief executive Tom Harrison

The England and Wales Cricket Board has confirmed Andrew Strauss as director of England cricket and Peter Moores has lost his job as coach.

The former captain Strauss’s appointment has been widely expected and he withdrew from broadcast duties at the one-day international in Dublin on Friday in order to avoid facing awkward questions. The announcement was brought forward ahead of the announcement of Moores’ sacking.

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England’s new boys show some promise before Ireland game is rained off

• Match abandoned after 18 overs
• Ireland 56/4 before rain stopped play
Moores to lose England job once Strauss takes charge

At midday the news broke that Peter Moores was set to be removed as England’s head coach. Five minutes later the rain falling on the Malahide Cricket Club had become too heavy to continue and the players trudged off the field. By 3.10pm the match was abandoned.

Just 18 overs were bowled with four Irish wickets claimed at a cost of 56 runs. But while this brief glimpse of the new generation of England one-day cricketers had offered flashes of encouragement – including strikes for two of the five debutants on show – the fixture finished a damp squib. And the cricket will not be what it is remembered for.

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Peter Moores tried his best, but sorry World Cup was beginning of the end

He inherited a side fractured by an Ashes whitewash, but while signs of progress were there with the Test team, coach’s one-day flaws were too great to overlook
Peter Moores to lose England role as Strauss calls shots
Moores inspires cynicism rather than hope for England’s future

It was a soggy, sorry end to Peter Moores’ time as the head coach of England. He had been dutiful to the last, insisting he flew straight to Ireland from the Caribbean when the opportunity was there to go home. That he went to a coastal town near Dublin was not a last-ditch attempt to save a job, for that decision will already have been decided, perhaps even before the Test defeat in Barbados. He went because he cares and it is his job. People can accuse Moores of all sorts of things but a lack of diligence or enthusiasm would not count among them.

Muddy, murky Malahide will have seen the death rattle of his international career, the second time it has been cut short. The first time around, when he succeeded Duncan Fletcher, it was said the old lags in the side, used to the previous coach’s manner and ways, could not take Moores’ in-your-face challenging methods, something that most notoriously manifested itself when he insisted on a full-on training session right after a one-day international as a demonstration of physical and mental intent. In essence, he was attempting to impose the same disciplines and structures on a group of experienced international cricketers as he did with the young players at Sussex. He read it wrong.

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Peter Moores tried his best, but sorry World Cup was beginning of the end

He inherited a side fractured by an Ashes whitewash, but while signs of progress were there with the Test team, coach’s one-day flaws were too great to overlook
Peter Moores to lose England role as Strauss calls shots
Moores inspires cynicism rather than hope for England’s future

It was a soggy, sorry end to Peter Moores’ time as the head coach of England. He had been dutiful to the last, insisting he flew straight to Ireland from the Caribbean when the opportunity was there to go home. That he went to a coastal town near Dublin was not a last-ditch attempt to save a job, for that decision will already have been decided, perhaps even before the Test defeat in Barbados. He went because he cares and it is his job. People can accuse Moores of all sorts of things but a lack of diligence or enthusiasm would not count among them.

Muddy, murky Malahide will have seen the death rattle of his international career, the second time it has been cut short. The first time around, when he succeeded Duncan Fletcher, it was said the old lags in the side, used to the previous coach’s manner and ways, could not take Moores’ in-your-face challenging methods, something that most notoriously manifested itself when he insisted on a full-on training session right after a one-day international as a demonstration of physical and mental intent. In essence, he was attempting to impose the same disciplines and structures on a group of experienced international cricketers as he did with the young players at Sussex. He read it wrong.

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Peter Moores to lose England job once Andrew Strauss takes charge at ECB

• Strauss’s appointment as director of cricket will spell end for head coach
• Alastair Cook’s position as captain also threatened by ECB shake-up
• Andy Bull: Peter Moores inspires cynicism rather than hope
• Ireland v England: One-day international – live!

Peter Moores is set to be removed as England head coach after Andrew Strauss takes over as the new director of cricket.

The Guardian has learned that Moores’ second spell in charge of the national team will be ended with the arrival of Strauss, whose appointment will be confirmed early next week by the England and Wales Cricket Board.

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James Taylor’s straight bat can’t smother speculation over Peter Moores’ future

• Taylor captains England in one-day match against Ireland on Friday
• Moores could lose job once Andrew Strauss unveiled as director of cricket
Moores heads to Ireland knowing ODI could be his last game as head coach

As Peter Moores was taking practice for possibly the final time as the England head coach, the stand-in one-day captain James Taylor was in front of the microphones insisting Friday’s international against Ireland in Dublin was important for all involved, not just one man.

With Andrew Strauss having agreed to become England’s director of cricket, the attention has switched to Moores and whether his new superior sees him as the man to take the national side forward, having himself been set the dual target of winning the Ashes and the World Cup in 2019.

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England’s Peter Moores heads to Ireland knowing ODI could be his last game

• England coach’s future hangs in the balance
• New director of cricket Andrew Strauss to help decide fate
• Andy Bull: How will New Zealand stars switch from the IPL to Lord’s Test?

Peter Moores completes the 4,000-mile journey from Barbados to Dublin on Thursday in time for Friday’s one-day international against Ireland knowing his future as England’s head coach has probably already been decided.

Moores has been told that Andrew Strauss has agreed to take the job as the new director of England cricket – confirmation of which could spill into next week – and will be fully aware that discussions over his own position took place during the recruitment process. remains a popular figure among the senior players and support staff, including the Test captain, Alastair Cook, and is understood to be relaxed about his fate.

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Peter Moores says England ‘moving right way’ despite Barbados defeat

• Coach says drawn tour of West Indies ‘really good trip internally’
• ‘Emergence of teams and players is never a straightforward curve’
Ross Taylor says England are not Mickey Mouse team

Peter Moores will leave Barbados later this week, en route to Dublin and the Ireland team, insistent that he wants to stay in his job and asking for more time to develop a young England side. There have been inevitable calls for Moores to be replaced following a disastrous World Cup, in which England were eliminated before the knock-out stages, and a loss to West Indies in the third Test in Barbados which meant the series was shared with one Test win apiece.

“Coaches always want time,” Moores said on the morning after the match. “I think we’re moving the right way. I think this has been a really good trip in many, many ways internally within that group. Watching us develop, the way people are sort of getting how you have to go about being successful at international cricket, the intensity it needs. Some people are starting to get to the point, I think they’re feeling a bit more relaxed with an England shirt on, which is important. It doesn’t mean you’re not proud and you’re not up for it, but it’s about being able to play the game and still relax and do your skill.

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England in good spirits but question mark remains over Jonathan Trott

Peter Moores may call the win in the second Test against West Indies ‘a reward for hard work’ and Jimmy Anderson deserves his plaudits but the jury is out on other issues
• Alastair Cook reserves special praise for match-winning Jimmy Anderson
• Mike Selvey’s match report on the final day of the second Test

England can move on to Barbados in good heart. The win in Grenada, sparked by an inspired Jimmy Anderson on the final morning, came at a time when most people were expecting the match to drift to a soporific end. The best cricketers are those who can elevate their game to a different level when the call comes and Anderson had the force with him. It turned the game on its head and the belief in the players, which is strong, rose visibly with it.

So Peter Moores, an enthusiast for whom being merely cheerful means he has had a bad day, had every reason to smile the morning after. “I think when we arrived it was an unexpected outcome,” the coach said at the team hotel, “because we’d bowled very well the last session of the first day. But they were 79 for one off 36 overs and they played really well. We couldn’t have given much more. I think we knew the second new ball was going to be the key and we’d have to bowl very well with it, and things would have to go our way: both things happened.

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Ian Bell the pick of the batsmen as England prepare for West Indies

• Bell scored 59 in the first match and retired on 43 in the second
• Captain Alastair Cook makes 22 from 88 balls before retiring
• Michael Vaughan a better bet as director of cricket than a football tipster

While turmoil reigned 4,000 miles away in London, England were attempting to get on with the job of preparing for their first Test match in eight months.

Amid all the conjecture which has followed the power vacuum left by Paul Downton’s dismissal as the managing director of England cricket, it is easy to forget Alastair Cook and his team begin a three-Test series against West Indies in Antigua on Monday.

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Gary Ballance eager to impress and get critics off Peter Moores’ back

‘You have to learn from what you did badly and try to get better, that’s what we’re doing,’ says the Yorkshire batsman and England No3. ‘It’s a change of format and we’ve won our last three Tests’
• Kevin Pietersen hits out at Graham Gooch’s role in 1982 rebel tour

If any member of England’s touring party in the Caribbean can be forgiven for having a World Cup hangover it is Gary Ballance. The 25-year-old batsman was parachuted into the team, at the key position of No3 no less, on the eve of the team’s opening match of the tournament against Australia in the bear pit of the MCG. It would have been a tough ask of anyone, let alone a relative international rookie who had only just overcome a fractured finger.

Ballance duly bombed, his sequence of scores reading 10, 10, 10 and six before he was dropped for the penultimate group match against Bangladesh in Adelaide, where defeat consigned England to the most ignominious of early World Cup exits. However, a new tour promises a fresh start and Ballance can console himself with a remarkable set of statistics in Test cricket. The Zimbabwean-born batsman averages 60.75 across eight matches and has three centuries and three fifties to his name. So the reasons for optimism are there and he is keen to play them up.

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Gary Ballance eager to impress and get critics off Peter Moores’ back

‘You have to learn from what you did badly and try to get better, that’s what we’re doing,’ says the Yorkshire batsman and England No3. ‘It’s a change of format and we’ve won our last three Tests’
• Kevin Pietersen hits out at Graham Gooch’s role in 1982 rebel tour

If any member of England’s touring party in the Caribbean can be forgiven for having a World Cup hangover it is Gary Ballance. The 25-year-old batsman was parachuted into the team, at the key position of No3 no less, on the eve of the team’s opening match of the tournament against Australia in the bear pit of the MCG. It would have been a tough ask of anyone, let alone a relative international rookie who had only just overcome a fractured finger.

Ballance duly bombed, his sequence of scores reading 10, 10, 10 and six before he was dropped for the penultimate group match against Bangladesh in Adelaide, where defeat consigned England to the most ignominious of early World Cup exits. However, a new tour promises a fresh start and Ballance can console himself with a remarkable set of statistics in Test cricket. The Zimbabwean-born batsman averages 60.75 across eight matches and has three centuries and three fifties to his name. So the reasons for optimism are there and he is keen to play them up.

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