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Category: Metropolitan police

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Police investigate claims Willie McKay threatened to kill Cardiff City staff

• McKay was involved in Emiliano Sala’s transfer to Cardiff • Allegations relate to dispute that followed player’s deathThe man who brokered the deal that brought Emiliano Sala to Cardiff is under investigation for an alleged public order offence in Lo…

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West Ham hand evidence to police over alleged abuse of Mohamed Salah

Club statement condemns ‘abhorrent racist abuse’Fare Network say recent rise in incidents is alarmingWest Ham have handed evidence to the Metropolitan Police after investigating the apparent Islamophobic abuse of Liverpool’s Mohamed Salah by one of the…

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Police question suspect over alleged abuse of Raheem Sterling

Met says TV and CCTV footage is being examined to see if offence was committedA man alleged to have hurled racist abuse at footballer Raheem Sterling during a televised Premier League game has been questioned under criminal caution, the Metropolitan po…

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Hillsborough family criticises Met chief over IPCC claim

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe had said ‘investigation has concluded I did nothing wrong’ even though inquiry continues

Britain’s most senior police officer is facing further criticism in relation to the 1989 Hillsborough disaster, after he stated last week that he has been found to have “done nothing wrong” on the day, in which 96 people died.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the Metropolitan police commissioner, made the comments when responding to a report from the Independent Police Complaints Commission, whose investigation remains ongoing into how 96 people were unlawfully killed.

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Met chief gave misleading account about Hillsborough, IPCC finds

Watchdog finds Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe not guilty of misconduct despite finding he made false claim about giving evidence

Britain’s most senior police officer gave a misleading account about the evidence he provided following the Hillsborough disaster in 1989, but he remains innocent of any misconduct, the Independent Police Complaints Commission has found.

Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the commissioner of the Metropolitan police, who has announced he will retire in February, was cleared by the IPCC following a complaint about statements he made in 2012 and 2013.

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Metropolitan police to investigate sex abuse claims at London clubs

• Team of specialist officers to look into ‘non-recent’ crimes
• Met become 22nd force to investigate claims of sexual abuse in football

Britain’s largest police force has launched an investigation into sex abuse claims involving London football clubs.

The Metropolitan police said a team of specialist officers from its sexual offences, exploitation and child abuse command would probe allegations of “non-recent” crimes – but refused to say which clubs it was investigating.

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Police ‘opted against action’ over Chelsea ex-player’s sex abuse claim

Former youth player ‘took historic allegations involving former chief scout Eddie Heath to Metropolitan Police’

The former Chelsea youth-team player who says he was sexually assaulted by the chief scout during the 1970s is understood to have approached the police prior to seeking and securing compensation from the club.

The current Premier League leaders have appointed independent lawyers to carry out an investigation into Eddie Heath, who worked at the club between 1968 and 1979 and died in the late 1980s. A compensation payment was sanctioned at boardroom level at Chelsea within the last three years to a former youth-team player after he approached the club to complain of being abused by Heath, apparently emboldened by the publicity over the outing of Jimmy Savile as a serial paedophile.

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Sam Allardyce urges Daily Telegraph to release its secret tapes

Sacked England manager hopes to be exonerated by full record of meeting

Sam Allardyce is demanding that the Daily Telegraph release its tape recordings of his meeting with the newspaper’s undercover reporters, which led to his dismissal as England’s football manager.

Allardyce believes the full tape recordings might exonerate his behaviour – although the newspaper has been warned by City of London police not to give the tapes to any third party because of its ongoing investigations into allegations of bribery and corruption in British football management.

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Metropolitan police to be deployed inside London Stadium for Stoke visit

• Security has been a major problem since West Ham’s move to the ground
• Stoke’s Mark Hughes happy with security arrangements in east London

The Metropolitan police will deploy officers inside the London Stadium for West Ham United’s Premier League fixture with Stoke City on Saturday.

Related: West Ham’s Olympic Stadium deal explained: from Water City to the London Stadium

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Metropolitan police to be deployed inside London Stadium for Stoke visit

• Security has been a major problem since West Ham’s move to the ground
• Stoke’s Mark Hughes happy with security arrangements in east London

The Metropolitan police will deploy officers inside the London Stadium for West Ham United’s Premier League fixture with Stoke City on Saturday.

Related: West Ham’s Olympic Stadium deal explained: from Water City to the London Stadium

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West Ham’s new home faces tinderbox tie test with Chelsea supplying the fuse

The EFL Cup match on Wednesday will be the most stringent examination of policing and stewarding at West Ham’s London Stadium as well as evaluating the ground’s ability to recreate Upton Park’s atmosphere

Rather earlier in the season than hoped for by some and feared by others, West Ham United’s London Stadium home will face its sternest test on Wednesday when more than 5,000 Chelsea fans make the journey to Stratford.

Not only will the EFL Cup tie be the latest and most stringent examination of policing and stewarding inside and outside the stadium but it will also be the most effective barometer yet of whether the expansive London Stadium can come anywhere close to reproducing an atmosphere to rival the intensity of Upton Park.

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West Ham’s new home faces tinderbox tie test with Chelsea supplying the fuse

The EFL Cup match on Wednesday will be the most stringent examination of policing and stewarding at West Ham’s London Stadium as well as evaluating the ground’s ability to recreate Upton Park’s atmosphere

Rather earlier in the season than hoped for by some and feared by others, West Ham United’s London Stadium home will face its sternest test on Wednesday when more than 5,000 Chelsea fans make the journey to Stratford.

Not only will the EFL Cup tie be the latest and most stringent examination of policing and stewarding inside and outside the stadium but it will also be the most effective barometer yet of whether the expansive London Stadium can come anywhere close to reproducing an atmosphere to rival the intensity of Upton Park.

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London Stadium owners working with Met police to oversee West Ham games

• E20 says it will install required radio system at venue
• Trouble broke out at home match against Watford

London Stadium owner E20 is working with the Metropolitan Police to install the required radio system which will allow additional special policing services to be put in place for West Ham home matches, but insists there are no significant concerns over the current safety plans.

West Ham have demanded a police presence at future matches after crowd trouble during Saturday’s 4-2 Premier League defeat to Watford.

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Police seek four men in connection with West Ham violence

Met police release pictures of men they want to speak to following attack on Manchester United team bus on TuesdayFour men are being sought by police investigating the attack on the Manchester United team bus before a Premier League game on Tuesday nig…

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West Ham flashpoint brief but shameful on a night not to be forgotten

The game turned out to be a thriller but the image that the minority of fans managed to portray was a long way from the one West Ham had wanted on the night they said farewell to their ground of 112 years

With the benefit of hindsight, Asif Yasin, who owns Elliott Davis Properties opposite the Boleyn Ground, would not make the same decision again. At 5.30pm on Tuesday he got into his car and tried to drive along Green Street up to the junction with Barking Road. It is a stretch of roughly 100 metres. “I was in my car for an hour and a half,” Yasin says.

When he reached the corner, he found himself alongside the bus that was carrying the visiting Manchester United players and staff. It was gridlock. And then it happened. In images that quickly hit social media and swirled around the world, a group of West Ham United fans decided to throw an array of things at the stationary vehicle. Yasin was in the midst of the storm.

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Chelsea fans in Paris Métro racism row in court fight against travel bans

Victim says his life has been shattered: ‘I want justice to be done’

Four Chelsea fans who face travel bans during international matches due to their alleged involvement in a racist incident on the Paris Métro go to court on Wednesday to fight the banning orders.

The men will appear at Stratford magistrates court, east London, after video footage showed a black man attempting to get on a Métro carriage but being pushed off by a group of fans travelling to a Chelsea Champions League match in February.

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Chelsea fans allegedly involved in Paris Metro racist incident identified

Metropolitan police say they have spoken to three men about incident on Paris Metro and are liaising with French authoritiesThree men sought in connection with an alleged racist incident involving Chelsea football fans on a Paris Metro train have been …

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Chris Cairns admits he has been contacted by the Metropolitan police

ICC has also been in contact, says former all-rounder Cairns’ London barrister arrested and bailed in London

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Met police’s Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe referred to IPCC over Hillsborough role

Hogan-Howe was inspector with South Yorkshire police at time of disaster at Sheffield’s Hillsborough football ground in 1989

The Metropolitan police commissioner, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, has been formally referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission for investigation over his role in the Hillsborough disaster. The IPCC said the mayor’s office for policing and crime had referred the complaints.

Meanwhile, a court has heard further allegations that South Yorkshire police tampered with evidence from the disaster. Pete Weatherby QC, representing 22 bereaved families affiliated to the Hillsborough Justice Campaign, told a pre-inquest hearing that film of events on the day, taken by the police with hand-held cameras, has an “unexplained gap” of 10 minutes. “I stress, there may be integrity issues here,” he said.

A further complaint about Hogan-Howe was made by Paul Spearritt, whose older brother, Adam, was 14 when he and 95 others were killed in the crush in the Leppings Lane “pens” at Sheffield Wednesday’s Hillsborough football ground on April 15 1989. The Spearritt family were distressed that Adam was incorrectly included in a list of people “safe and well” read out on the evening of the disaster by a senior South Yorkshire police officer at a Sheffield boys’ club where anxious friends and relatives were waiting for news.

Hogan-Howe was at the time an inspector with South Yorkshire police, and served as a senior officer at the boys’ club. The IPCC said it would investigate whether Hogan-Howe read out the list, as part of its ongoing investigation into alleged police misconduct leading to the deaths, and the subsequent alleged police “cover-up”.

After the Hillsborough Independent Panel published its report last year, Hogan-Howe said he had originally made a statement to the Taylor inquiry, then declined to change his statement when later contacted by a police officer. It appears Hogan-Howe never made a statement about his actions at Hillsborough. The IPCC said it “must now decide how this matter should be investigated.”

Hogan-Howe has said that he will “co-operate fully with any inquiries from the IPCC”.

Weatherby’s assertion that 10 minutes of video footage, which could have included the build-up to the fatal crush, are missing, followed concerns he previously expressed that South Yorkshire police may have tampered with film. Weatherby asked the coroner, Lord Justice Goldring, to give permission for the families’ appointed expert to examine the tapes forensically.

The IPCC told the coroner that 240 South Yorkshire police officers’ accounts of the disaster were subsequently altered. Thirteen officers, all retired and not suspected of misconduct, are refusing to co-operate with the investigation. The IPCC has interviewed 143 officers so far.

The new inquest is due to start in Warrington on 31 March next year. The original inquest’s verdict of accidental death was quashed last December after more than 20 years of campaigning by the families.

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Hillsborough: communication between police and families ‘a shambles’

Former archdeacon of Sheffield criticises lack of organisation in operation dealing with bereaved families at time of disaster

The Metropolitan police commissioner headed an operation dealing with bereaved families at the Hillsborough disaster which was “utter chaos” and “a shambles,” according to a senior church figure who was involved in ministering to the families.

Stephen Lowe, then the archdeacon of Sheffield, said “there was no organisation, no information, no sense of the police working in partnership,” at the Hillsborough boys’ club where anxious families were kept waiting for news, which was overseen by Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, then an inspector in the South Yorkshire police.

Lowe said one member of the clergy and one social worker were allocated to each family at the boys’ club, but Hogan-Howe and his police officers kept themselves apart while providing no information about the many people missing.

“The inspector was not working as part of the team,” said Lowe, who later became bishop of Hulme in Manchester. “There was no organisation – it was utter chaos, a shambles. The police were defensive; we could not get information; there was no sense of partnership or that they were there to help us do what was needed…”

Lowe said it was “incomprehensible” and “a genuine omission,” that Hogan-Howe appears never to have made a statement about what happened. Hogan-Howe said last year that he had made a statement to the official Taylor inquiry and subsequently refused to change it, but as the Observer revealed last week, that appears not to be true.

Hogan-Howe said he had been confused when he said he made a statement to the Taylor inquiry. In fact, the account he referred to is a brief, six-line note of a telephone conversation in May 1990, when Taylor’s inquiry was over.

On April 15 1989, Lowe said he had seen on television the unfolding disaster, in which 96 Liverpool football club supporters were killed at the FA Cup semi-final against Nottingham Forest. He went to Hillsborough to offer the church’s help, and was asked by South Yorkshire police to open the boys’ club for families, because Hammerton Road police station could not cope with the numbers of distraught people seeking news.

Hogan-Howe, who was at the time seconded to studying at Oxford university and was in Sheffield for the weekend, answered a call for off- duty officers, and was put in charge of the boys’ club. Lowe did make a statement to the Taylor inquiry, in which he said Hogan-Howe’s arrival initially “did improve the situation.” However Lowe believed Hogan-Howe himself was short of information about missing people, then while the priests and social workers were “getting the brunt of the emotions of relatives and friends,” he said: “I felt that we were not being included in any of the decisions taken by the police. Communication at this stage with the police was not as good as it should have been.”

Lowe said he did not know why communication was poor, but police radios may not have been working well. That was a factor in the policing chaos at the football ground which led to the disaster.

Of the revelation that Hogan-Howe never made a statement, Lowe said: “It is incomprehensible. The families had to wait for hours at the boys’ club in very unsatisfactory circumstances, then those whose relatives had died were taken to the gymnasium at the football ground to identify the body. The screams I heard from the families that night will stay with me forever.

“The trauma of Hillsborough was not just the deaths, it was the aftermath as well. The boys club is an important part of what happened at Hillsborough and the lack of a statement from the officer in charge at the boys’ club is a genuine omission.”

Paul Spearritt, the younger brother of Adam, who died at Hillsborough aged 14, said Lowe’s account added more questions the family have about what happened that night. A senior officer at the boys’ club read out a list of names at 7:20pm who were “alive and well,” and Adam’s name was incorrectly on it, adding to the Spearritt family’s distress.

The family has now complained to the Independent Police Complaints Commission’s Hillsborough inquiry, asking it to investigate how Adam came to be on the list, why South Yorkshire police have never explained it, and why Hogan-Howe has never made a statement. The Spearritts also want an investigation into Hogan-Howe’s comments last year, when he said incorrectly that he had made a statement to Taylor then declined to change it.

The Metropolitan Police said the IPCC should investigate the apparent lack of any statement by Hogan-Howe after the disaster. As for his role on the day, the Met said: “Since the IPCC has indicated that the events of 15 April 1989, including those at the Hillsborough boys’ club, form part of the [IPCC-managed] Operation Resolve inquiry it would be inappropriate for the Commissioner to give further details about his role or recollections of the operation before those conducting the inquiry have had the opportunity to speak to him first.

“It is however, well documented in the Taylor Report and subsequent reviews and inquiries that communications and information flow posed major problems for the police response.”

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