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Category: Magnus Carlsen

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Chess: Magnus Carlsen aims for strong showing at illustrious Wijk aan Zee

The world champion had a disappointing 2017 in classical elite tournaments but has a chance to turn things around when the ‘Wimbledon of chess’ beginsMagnus Carlsen, the world champion, attempts to break an alarming sequence of setbacks in classical el…

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Chess: lucrative world speed events to open in Saudi Arabia amid controversy

Magnus Carlsen is among those scheduled to appear at the event in Riyadh which has been dogged by issues surrounding visas for Israeli participants and the dress code for women competitorsThe 2017 world rapid (half-hour games) and blitz (five-minute) c…

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The US No1 rose to second in the world behind Magnus Carlsen with wins in round four and five and Caruana now looks set to do well in the 2018 candidatesThis week’s London Classic at the Olympia Conference Centre has produced an epidemic of draws, with…

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The world champion will play a 12-game series in November next year against the winner of the candidates seriesMagnus Carlsen’s next defence of his world crown will be a 12-game series in London from 9-28 November 2018. The decision, already widely rum…

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London to host Magnus Carlsen’s world chess championship defense in 2018

Carlsen to defend title against opponent to be decided in MarchLondon to host world championship match for first time since 2000Best-of-12-games match has been scheduled for 9-28 NovemberMagnus Carlsen will make his third defense of the world chess cha…

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The world champion took first prize with an unbeaten 7.5/9 which was enough to increase the gap between him and his closest rival, Levon Aronian, to 36 points

Magnus Carlsen has seen off his rivals, at least for the moment. Following his early elimination from the World Cup in Tbilisi the 26-year-old world champion made the bold decision to travel to Douglas for the Chess.com Isle of Man Open. He left behind his normal entourage of parents, manager and trainer but brought his girlfriend, Synne Christin Larsen.

Carlsen led all the way, used some offbeat openings like 1…g6 and 1…b6, won several creative games, made a trip to the top of Snaefell, the Isle’s highest point and captured the £50,000 first prize with an unbeaten 7.5/9, half a point ahead of Hikaru Nakamura of the US and India’s Vishy Anand. It was the Norwegian’s first victory in a classical tournament for more than a year.

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The 128-player tournament in Tiblisi, Georgia, includes 35 of the players ranked in the top 40 and offers an impressive prize of $140,000 for the winner as well as places in the 2018 candidates series

The 128-player, $1.6m World Cup starts in Tbilisi, Georgia, at midday on Sunday and is a mighty event, a must-watch for chess fans. Magnus Carlsen, the world champion, is competing, along with 35 of the top 40 elite grandmasters.

Its format of two-game mini-matches followed by speed tie-breaks at ever-faster rates is challenging. A single error and elimination looms. The rewards at the end are $140,000 for the winner and two places in the 2018 candidates which will decide Carlsen’s next title challenger. For Russia’s Vlad Kramnik, Armenia’s Levon Aronian and America’s Hikaru Nakamura, top 10 players who have little or no chance of qualifying for the candidates via the rating list or the Fide Grand Prix, the World Cup is the last chance saloon.

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Chess: Magnus Carlsen risks world No1 rating with slump in Stavanger

Norway’s 26-year-old world champion has topped the rankings for six years but five defeats in the first seven rounds have put five rivals in striking distance

Magnus Carlsen’s career is in crisis and this week Norway’s 26-year-old world champion has been on the brink of losing the No1 ranking he has held without a break for almost six years.

Carlsen was in joint last place in the Altibox Norway elite event at Stavanger, with a pack of eager rivals within one game of usurping his No1 position, but he was saved, at least for the moment, when his old rival, Russia’s Sergey Karjakin, blundered a drawn position in Thursday’s penultimate round to give the beleaguered champion a windfall point. Carlsen then drew with India’s Vishy Anand in Friday’s final round.

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Chess: Magnus Carlsen risks world No1 rating with slump in Stavanger

Norway’s 26-year-old world champion has topped the rankings for six years but five defeats in the first seven rounds have put five rivals in striking distance

Magnus Carlsen’s career is in crisis and this week Norway’s 26-year-old world champion has been on the brink of losing the No1 ranking he has held without a break for almost six years.

Carlsen was in joint last place in the Altibox Norway elite event at Stavanger, with a pack of eager rivals within one game of usurping his No1 position, but he was saved, at least for the moment, when his old rival, Russia’s Sergey Karjakin, blundered a drawn position in Thursday’s penultimate round to give the beleaguered champion a windfall point. Carlsen then drew with India’s Vishy Anand in Friday’s final round.

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Leonard Barden on Chess

Magnus Carlsen, the world champion, made the most embarrassing blunder of his career at Tata Steel Wijk aan Zee last weekend, missing a chance for a simple virtually forced mate in three moves, all of them rook checks. That game was drawn and the next day he lost after a series of errors. His lead in the official rankings, which the 26-year-old Norwegian says he prizes even more than the global crown, has shrunk drastically and is threatened by two American rivals.

This weekend’s crucial games at Wijk and at Tradewise Gibraltar could therefore be a defining moment for Carlsen. Only seven players, starting with the legendary Bobby Fischer, have been No1 since the official Fide list was instituted in 1971 and Carlsen’s tenure of the top spot has been unbroken since July 2011. However, in his last 23 classical games, the world title series against Sergey Karjakin in New York and the first 11 rounds at Wijk, he has only managed +4=17-2, well short of the dominance expected from a great champion.

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Leonard Barden on Chess

Magnus Carlsen, the world champion, made the most embarrassing blunder of his career at Tata Steel Wijk aan Zee last weekend, missing a chance for a simple virtually forced mate in three moves, all of them rook checks. That game was drawn and the next day he lost after a series of errors. His lead in the official rankings, which the 26-year-old Norwegian says he prizes even more than the global crown, has shrunk drastically and is threatened by two American rivals.

This weekend’s crucial games at Wijk and at Tradewise Gibraltar could therefore be a defining moment for Carlsen. Only seven players, starting with the legendary Bobby Fischer, have been No1 since the official Fide list was instituted in 1971 and Carlsen’s tenure of the top spot has been unbroken since July 2011. However, in his last 23 classical games, the world title series against Sergey Karjakin in New York and the first 11 rounds at Wijk, he has only managed +4=17-2, well short of the dominance expected from a great champion.

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Leonard Barden on Chess

The most famous chess tournament on the planet, Tata Steel Wijk aan Zee in the Netherlands, starts its 2017 edition this weekend with the first round free and live to watch online from 12.30pm on Saturday.

Its central theme will be Magnus Carlsen’s attempt to win by a clear margin and so reinforce the 26-year-old world champion’s ambitions to establish himself as the best player of all time ahead of the legends Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov.

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Leonard Barden on Chess

It was all about jetlag for Magnus Carlsen at the world rapid championship in Doha this week. The Norwegian won the 2014 and 2015 versions of the title, which was decided by 15 rounds of 15-minute games with 10 seconds per move increment, but for 2016 had to settle for the bronze medal on tie-break behind Vasily Ivanchuk of Ukraine and Alex Grischuk of Russia.

Carlsen flew in from Australia, where he had been on holiday since retaining his classical crown against Sergey Karjakin in New York last month. At Doha there were five rounds a day and all three of his losses, plus a lucky escape featured in this week’s puzzle, came early in the session.

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Was series of rapid games best way to decide world chess championship?

The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts

Was the “rapid” playoff – four quick games with an initial time limit of 25 minutes per player, with the threat of even faster “blitz” and “Armageddon” games to follow – really an appropriate way to decide the recent world chess championship final in New York, where Magnus Carlsen defeated Sergey Karjakin?

James Thomson, Manchester

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Magnus Carlsen’s dramatic fightback from ‘certain’ defeat cements his legend

He believed defeat was ‘certain’ after a series of self-inflicted wounds, but Magnus Carlsen overcame self-doubt and a stubborn opponent to show the greatest champions find the path to victory when they’re not at their best

Magnus Carlsen looked spent. It was Thursday morning in New York, less than a full day after he had survived the sternest test of his career to successfully defend the world chess championship on his 26th birthday. He’d celebrated into the night with dinner and a champagne shower at the BLT Prime steakhouse in Gramercy surrounded by family, sponsors and hangers-on. It was a catharsis hard-won.

Related: Magnus Carlsen may be the man to push the barriers for global game of chess | Stephen Moss

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Leonard Barden on Chess

Right on cue Magnus Carlsen’s previously stuttering form came back into flow for games three and four of the tiebreaks in New York on his 26th birthday. The world champion retained his crown by defeating Russia’s Sergey Karjakin 3-1 in one-hour rapids after their classical games ended 6-6. The match proved enormously popular with online audiences, was a media hit and had the most brilliant final move, a queen sacrifice for mate, of any world title series. Yet questions remain about the performance of both players.

The biggest mystery is what happened to Karjakin’s preparation. The challenger rightly gained plaudits for his tenacious, resilient and at times inspired defensive play, particularly in game two of the tiebreak when, despite playing for many moves on the three-seconds increment, he found a wonderful resource based on a bishop and rook pawn stalemate.

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Magnus Carlsen wins World Chess Championship in thrilling fashion – video

Magnus Carlsen from Norway wins the 2016 World Chess Championship in New York City on Wednesday, beating Russian Sergey Karjakin to the title. The pair had played out an epic final match in the lower Manhattan since early November and could not be sepa…

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Magnus Carlsen may be the man to push the barriers for global game of chess | Stephen Moss

Norwegian retains his world title after thrilling tiebreak and wows a global audience looking forward to more of the same

Just after Magnus Carlsen had defeated Sergey Karjakin to retain his world chess championship, at 1am UK time on Thursday morning, I looked at the Guardian home page and was astonished and delighted to see that the liveblog on the world championship was the third-most read item on its website. For a moment chess – ignored, marginalised, even derided by some – finally had its place in the sun.

The four rapidplay tie-breakers which decided the match, after 12 classical games had finished all-square, were one of those rare moments when all the stars aligned, creating a truly memorable event. It was Carlsen’s 26th birthday; rapidplay – where each player has about half an hour for all his moves – is fast enough to be exciting but provides sufficient time for “proper” chess to be played; Karjakin defended doughtily in a terrible position in game two and the Norwegian missed a win; and then, best of all, Carlsen found the most beautiful checkmate in the final game to secure the title.

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Magnus Carlsen retains world chess title after quickfire tie-breaker

Norwegian champion fights off determined challenge from Russia’s Sergey Karjakin with superior tactical aptitude

Twenty days ago, on the eve of a world championship match that would prove more gruelling and arduous than many observers had expected, Magnus Carlsen described his forthcoming title defence against Russia’s Sergey Karjakin in pugilistic terms.

“For me, it’s a matter of when I get the chance, I’ll try to punch him until he finally knocks over,” Carlsen said.

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Magnus Carlsen retains world chess title after quickfire tie-breaker

Norwegian champion fights off determined challenge from Russia’s Sergey Karjakin with superior tactical aptitude

Twenty days ago, on the eve of a world championship match that would prove more gruelling and arduous than many observers had expected, Magnus Carlsen described his forthcoming title defence against Russia’s Sergey Karjakin in pugilistic terms.

“For me, it’s a matter of when I get the chance, I’ll try to punch him until he finally knocks over,” Carlsen said.

Continue reading…