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Category: Human rights

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Hakeem al-Araibi: thank you Australia for bringing me home – but my fight is not over

Bahrain will do anything to hunt down dissident athletes and their families. International sporting bodies must step up to protect the helpless I can never truly express my gratitude to you all, the Australian people, for bringing me home. There were c…

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He’s free, but who’s to blame for Hakeem al-Araibi’s ordeal?

Campaigners examine whether the failings of Interpol, Australian police, the world’s footballing bodies and Thai authorities allowed the refugee athlete to fall into Bahrain’s webAs Hakeem al-Araibi settles back into his life in Melbourne after 76 days…

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Hakeem al-Araibi arrives in Australia to hero’s welcome

Wife of refugee thanks supporters for helping to secure his release as family call on Bahrain to ‘drop all the fabricated charges’Hakeem al-Araibi arrived in Melbourne on Tuesday, 77 days after he was arrested in Thailand on an Interpol red notice, dra…

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Hakeem al-Araibi: FFA cancels team trip to Thailand in support of refugee footballer

In first instance of sporting sanctions, Australia’s Under-23s Olyroos training trip cancelled amid outrage over Al-Araibi’s detention and extradition trialFootball Federation Australia has cancelled a planned Under-23s training trip to Thailand in the…

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Australia urges Thailand to use its powers to free Hakeem al-Araibi

Request comes as Thai prosecutor confirms country’s attorney general has authority to override court processThe Australian government has renewed demands for the release of Hakeem al-Araibi after the Thai prosecutor publicly confirmed the government ha…

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Hakeem al-Araibi faces further 60 days in Thai jail after extradition hearing

Refugee footballer arrived shackled and barefoot for hearing on Bahrain extradition requestRefugee footballer Hakeem al-Araibi has been given 60 days to prepare a defence against Bahrain’s attempt to extradite him from Thailand.The 25-year-old will rem…

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Hakeem al-Araibi’s detention not Sheikh Salman’s responsibility, AFC says

Asian Football Confederation, which has come under fire for failing to call for the refugee footballer’s release, says its president was recused from overseeing the region 18 months ago The Asian Football Confederation claims its president, Sheikh Salm…

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Football must go in hard on Bahrain over the Hakeem al-Araibi affair | Sean Ingle

It is time for Fifa and the IOC to threaten serious sporting sanctions if the Bahraini footballer detained in Thailand and facing extradition is not set freeThere is a striking story in The Club, Jonathan Clegg and Joshua Robinson’s new book on how the…

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‘Please help me’: refugee footballer Hakeem al-Araibi tells of his Thai jail ordeal

Exclusive: In an interview with the Guardian he pleads for his release and says he fears torture and jail if extradited to BahrainHakeem al-Araibi, the refugee footballer from Bahrain who was detained in Thailand while on his honeymoon, has said he is …

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Manchester City fans’ defence of UAE shows sportswashing in action | Barney Ronay

Tribal loyalty has been taken too far when supporters pontificate on an area that has nothing to do with football as if they are debating an offside decisionIt seems an odd detail now but the first person to find oil in Abu Dhabi was the deep sea explo…

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The UAE is trampling human rights. Man City must finally speak out | Simon Hattenstone

The jailing of British academic Matthew Hedges is an abuse the club can’t ignore. It’s time to pressure Sheikh MansourWhat is the price of success? If you’re a Manchester City fan with an interest in human rights, it’s a crisis of conscience. I’ve been…

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F1 finally admits concern over woman jailed for Bahrain Grand Prix protests

• Najah Yusuf jailed for three years over 2017 protests• F1 says it is making ongoing enquiries in BahrainFormula One chiefs have admitted for the first time that they are “concerned” that an activist who protested against the Bahrain Grand Prix on Fac…

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Qatar World Cup workers still exploited, says Amnesty report

Charity says promised government reforms to ‘kafala’ system have not taken place Migrant workers building infrastructure for the 2022 World Cup and other big projects in Qatar are still suffering exploitation and severe human rights violations despite …

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Human Rights Watch: testosterone limit for female athletes is discrimination

• Body calls for IAAF to scrap new rules on hyperandrogenism• IAAF ‘forcing women to have unnecessary interventions’Human Rights Watch has accused the International Association of Athletics Federations of discriminating against female athletes with nat…

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Who pays for Manchester City’s beautiful game? | Nick Cohen

It is considered ‘inappropriate’ to ask about the money behind Pep Guardiola’s team, and other leading clubs, but we should be asking the hard questionsEven though I come from the red side of Manchester, I want Manchester City to win every game they pl…

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China under-20 football tour suspended after pro-Tibet protests

Protesters unfurled Tibetan flags at a game in Mainz, Germany causing the Chinese team to walk off the pitchA tour of Germany by China’s under-20 men’s football team has been suspended after their first match was met with protests.The remaining games i…

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How Bahrain uses sport to whitewash a legacy of torture and human rights abuses | David Conn

Campaign groups argue that Bahrain’s association with glamour sport is used to ‘launder’ a more wholesome image for the country

The cyclist Sonny Colbrelli secured prominent exposure for the name of his Bahrain Merida team early in the Tour de France, heading the group sprint at the end of the second stage in Liège before finishing a creditable sixth. The team’s leader, Ion Izagirre, crashed out on the first day, but Bahrain Merida has already established itself on the world tour, after star signing Vincenzo Nibali competed through three spectacular weeks in May to claim a third place finish in the Giro d’Italia.

The cycling team, launched in January with an estimated £13.7m budget by Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad al-Khalifa, a son of the ruling King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa, is the latest venture which will help promote the autocratically ruled, troubled country through an association with globally televised sporting events.

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Fifa ‘has come up short’ in protecting Russia 2018 stadium workers

• Report claims Fifa has failed on promise to properly monitor labour conditions
• Employees forced to work in -25C temperatures without appropriate clothing

Fifa has fallen short of its commitment to protect workers on Russia’s World Cup stadiums who have been forced to do backbreaking labour in freezing conditions without appropriate clothing and not knowing if they will be paid, according to Human Rights Watch.

Related: ‘Like prisoners of war’: North Korean labour behind Russia 2018 World Cup

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Fifa ‘has come up short’ in protecting Russia 2018 stadium workers

• Report claims Fifa has failed on promise to properly monitor labour conditions
• Employees forced to work in -25C temperatures without appropriate clothing

Fifa has fallen short of its commitment to protect workers on Russia’s World Cup stadiums who have been forced to do backbreaking labour in freezing conditions without appropriate clothing and not knowing if they will be paid, according to Human Rights Watch.

Related: ‘Like prisoners of war’: North Korean labour behind Russia 2018 World Cup

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‘Like prisoners of war’: North Korean labour behind Russia 2018 World Cup

Claims of long hours, few breaks, dire living conditions, low pay and death emerge from construction of stadium in St Petersburg

A test opening of St Petersburg’s Zenit Arena in February treated 10,000 spectators to car racing, motorcycle tricks, dancers and a performing bear introduced as “Russia’s greatest hero”. But the patriotic ceremony failed to note that the stadium, in which Russia kick off the Confederations Cup in a fortnight in preparation for next year’s World Cup, was built mostly by immigrant workers from Asia, including from one of the world’s most repressive countries, North Korea.

A subcontractor who asked to remain anonymous said at least 190 “downtrodden” North Koreans had worked long hours with no days off between August and November last year and that one, a 47-year-old, had died on site. “These guys are afraid to speak to people. They don’t look at anyone. They’re like prisoners of war,” the subcontractor said.

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