rss

Category: Health & wellbeing

0

The perfect view of Gordon Banks’ greatest save | Brief letters

Gordon Banks | Lynton Crosby | Sleep disruption | MasturbationWhile popular opinion would have it that the save that Gordon Banks made at the 1970 World Cup was the greatest ever (Pelé leads tributes to ‘a goalkeeper with magic’, 13 February), I unders…

0

Rio Ferdinand: ‘I used to drink 10 pints then move on to vodka’

Since retiring, the former England footballer has campaigned against Brexit and knife crime, and made a moving documentary about the death of his wife. Now he has embarked on a health business – but is it credible?Rio Ferdinand has experienced terrible…

0

‘I felt I was not a good mom’: Serena Williams details post-partum struggles

Grand slam champion says motherhood has affected recent formAmerican suffered heavy defeat to Johanna Konta last weekSerena Williams has said concerns over motherhood have affected her recent form.Williams suffered the heaviest defeat of her career las…

0

Tom Daley: ‘If I hadn’t met Lance, I don’t know if I’d be diving now’

From being objectified at 14 to coming out five years later, the diver has lived his life in public. Still only 24, he talks about his marriage to Lance Black, fatherhood – and why he’s speaking out about gay rights around he worldYou could say this ab…

0

How the psychology of the England football team could change your life

England players seem happier and more grounded – and much of the credit goes to psychologist Pippa Grange. What can the team’s approach teach us all about facing fear and failure?This week, the England midfielder Dele Alli was asked if he was nervous a…

0

Why Harry Kane is an inspiration for chubby children everywhere

As an overweight kid, a role model like Kane would have helped me shrug off taunts and kick a ballOne of the lesser joys of England’s glorious run to the World Cup semi-finals has been the resurfacing of pictures of a young Harry Kane – notab…

0

Steve Redgrave: ‘I feared diabetes would end my rowing career’

The five-time Olympic gold medallist discusses competing after his diagnosis – and breaking down barriers for othersWhen Sir Steve Redgrave was diagnosed with diabetes 20 years ago at the age of 35, he thought it would mean the end of his rowing career…

0

Why Laird Hamilton is still making waves

Laird Hamilton found fame and fortune surfing the world’s biggest breakers. But, as he tells Tim Lewis, his daredevil streak could easily have led him down more dangerous paths as a young man. Plus, he reveals his life secrets for staying ahead of the …

0

Serena Williams: I almost died giving birth to my daughter

Grand slam champion says she was lucky to receive excellent care, but that others are not so fortunate after giving birthSerena Williams has written about the complications surrounding the birth of her daughter in an article for CNN.The former world No…

0

Cruz Beckham’s workout: should 12-year-olds be hitting the gym?

Whether it makes him a poster-boy for fitness or you think he’s missing out on a childhood munching doughnuts, the youngest Beckham boy’s gym snap is provoking debate

Pictures of a Beckham working out would normally be cause for celebration, but when 12-year-old Cruz (the third child of David and Victoria) posted a clip of himself at the gym on Instagram this week, there were disapproving tuts from a certain sort of internet user.

“It’s actually bad to work out when you’re a kid; your muscles get damaged,” warned one, below the video of Cruz on a rowing machine, viewed almost 200,000 times. “You are too young for this,” wrote another. A third suggested he “eat a donut and have a childhood”.

Continue reading…

0

How trampolining could become Britain’s new fitness craze

As trampoline parks spring up all over the country, Oliver Astley looks at the impact they could have on the nation’s fitness and lower limbs

The gate opens and about 100 children, and a handful of adults, fan out and start bouncing as if their tops were made out of rubber and their bottoms were made our of springs. Every day, the scene plays out up and down the country, from Inverness to Cornwall.

Three years ago, trampolining was confined to gymnastics clubs, schools and back gardens. Today, there are around 120 trampoline parks in the UK, which provide people with about 250,000 hours of exercise per week. That’s a lot of cardio, countless calories burned, many legs strengthened and, encouragingly for most jumpers, it even feels a little like exercise.

Continue reading…

0

Pep Guardiola’s pizza ban could be the topping on a title for Manchester City

Much-loved post-match nosh may have helped motivate Leicester to win the Premier League but there is scant evidence it is of much nutritional value

Lionel Messi and Luis Suárez have a taste for it and Cristiano Ronaldo often digs into a slice after games. Claudio Ranieri used it as a motivation tool during Leicester City’s title win, bringing his squad to a local Italian restaurant following their first clean sheet of the season. But their success is not sufficient evidence for Pep Guardiola, because pizza will not pass the mouths of any Manchester City players this season.

Related: Paolo Di Canio’s revolution: coffee, coke and mobiles out at Sunderland

Continue reading…

0

Let’s get physical: how women’s sport can conquer body image

Body image issues ought to have no place in sports, but it stops many women from getting involved. It’s time to celebrate female bodies for what they can do

I’ll never forget the first time I saw a naked woman who wasn’t my mum. I was 12; she was a grown-up and standing in the showers at our local swimming pool, soaping her pubic hair into a lather. I don’t remember anything about her face, just her body: sinewy with some wobbly bits, and a big bush down below. At the time the sight of women displaying their bodies prompted giggles, embarrassment and the odd sneer of derision from me and my school-age friends. For pubescent girls, showing any part of your naked body is anathema. It was an unspoken rule that you had to undress without anyone catching sight of your body.

Why do we teach young girls to care first about how they look and second about their talent?

Continue reading…

0

Greg Rutherford freezes sperm over Olympics Zika fears

Long jumper’s partner also reveals she and their son will not attend Rio Games amid concerns about disease affecting newborns

The British Olympian Greg Rutherford has frozen a sample of his sperm before attending the Olympic Games in Rio because of his concerns over the Zika virus.

Rutherford’s partner, Susie Verrill, said the couple, who have a son called Milo, decided to freeze his sperm because they wanted to have more children in the future and were worried about the risks of the disease. Zika infections in pregnant women have been linked to babies being born with microcephaly, or an unusually small skull, and other severe brain defects.

Continue reading…

0

‘If you don’t talk, it doesn’t work’: how sport helps autistic people

The intrinsic importance of social skills in sport means it can be a more effective treatment than traditional therapy

“A few years ago, I couldn’t even go out of the house by myself,” says Daniel Mynott. That was before he started getting involved in sport. “Now, I go all over London and the country. I have so many friends I’ve lost count. I even have my own car.”

Mynott has autism. A few years ago, when he was 15, the Change Foundation turned up at his school and encouraged him to try taking part in sport. “I hated sport,” he says. “I was lazy as hell, but they saw my potential, they saw I was good with people. Gradually, I fell in love with it.”

Continue reading…

0

Shauna Coxsey: the British champion transforming the image of climbing

British bouldering star Shauna Coxsey is the early favourite to win a world title this year. As her sport bids for Olympic status, she reveals what it takes to get to the top – and why more women are taking part

A slight, 23-year-old British woman emerged before a crowd of several thousand spectators in Chongqing, China, to perform as the final competitor in a event that has flown largely under the radar of the sports pages.

Above her, on an overhanging construction of plywood 20 feet high, were a series of holds – plastic protuberances in salmon pink and fluorescent yellow – which Shauna Coxsey was required to climb.

Continue reading…

0

Paralympic athletes ‘may have put disabled people off exercise’

‘Superhuman’ athletes at 2012 London Paralympics discouraged disabled people from ‘having a go’, Alastair Hignell says

The 2012 London Paralympics may have put off some people with a disability taking up exercise, a former sports star who has multiple sclerosis has suggested.

Alastair Hignell, who played rugby union for England and cricket for Gloucestershire before becoming a broadcaster, said its athletes were so “superhuman” that many with a disability would not think of having a go.

Continue reading…

0

Professional cycling’s latest scandal: unshaved legs

World road race champion Peter Sagan surprised the rest of the peloton by going au naturel on the road. Is it really ‘disrespectful’ to fellow riders to be a hairy biker?

It’s fair to say that amid the sometimes over-serious world of professional bike riding, Peter Sagan already stands out as a bit flamboyant.

For his wedding last year, the 26-year-old Slovakian wore a gold trimmed tunic, arrived in a Trabant car and at one point rode a miniature penny farthing across a tightrope. When he was crowned world road race champion he briefly opted for a flashy, all-white ensemble to complement the rainbow stripes which come with the title.

Continue reading…

0

Sofa 1 Exercise 0: is that the great Olympic legacy Blair promised?

Mo Farah and Jessica Ennis-Hill were supposed to inspire us to be active. But the latest depressing figures will surprise no one who understands spectator sport

The finding by Sport England that fewer adults in England are doing even half an hour’s moderate sporting exercise a week, with a particular drop among the poor, has dealt another blow to the grand claims made for the 2012 London Olympics.

Tony Blair famously added the vote of the International Olympic Committee to other global triumphs when he promised a Games that would “see millions more young people in Britain and across the world participating in sport and improving their lives”. The organisers made “fostering a healthy and active nation” one of their promises as they set about spending the £9bn it cost to host 26 days of elite competition in that glorious and now half-remembered summer.

Continue reading…

0

Menstruation: the last great sporting taboo

When Heather Watson crashed out of the Australian Open this week, she put her poor performance down to starting her period – publicly breaking the silence on an issue that affects all sportswomen. But why is it still something we never hear about?

Continue reading…