rss

Category: Cricket

0

England Women’s World Cup triumph should transform fortunes of the players

• Exposure from victory could lead to advertising and sponsorship deals
• Win described as ‘watershed moment’ by Anya Shrubsole and Clare Connor

The lives of England’s World Cup-winning team and future generations of female cricketers will be transformed by the victory, according to leading agents and sport marketing experts.

Anya Shrubsole, whose incredible bowling turned almost certain defeat into victory against India, said it felt like a “watershed moment” for the sport played out before a capacity crowd at Lord’s. The £512,000 prize-money has been split equally among the 15-strong squad, meaning £34,000 a player. For players on central contracts worth around £50,000 plus match fees and bonuses, that represents a huge increase in their annual income.

Continue reading…

0

Anya Shrubsole: ‘It is quite hard to remember everything that happened’

England’s hero from the Women’s World Cup final victory over India says she was so focused during the match the scale of her achievement took time to sink in

The power of recall among sports people is a peculiar thing. Perhaps it is because their work relies on reaction and instinct but many are prone to misremembering their own spectacular feats: forgetting dates, venues or even the details of the performance itself. For example, in cricket, it is common for batsmen looking back on their careers to recall an early breakthrough knock as a century when it may have only been a match-winning 60. Slowly but surely the sands of time scrape away at authentic memory.

During England’s celebrations deep into the London night, after the most miraculous of World Cup wins against India at Lord’s, Anya Shrubsole, player of the match award stuffed in her bag after a match-winning six for 46 (such is her modesty her medal was buried deeper instead of around her neck), was given a piece of advice: to write something down – her feelings, her emotions or simply the thoughts running through her head; to commit to paper a moment that deserves permanency.

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup moves cricket closer to Olympic return in 2024

• Popularity of women’s tournament has helped sway the ICC and the IOC
• India’s BCCI will meet on Wednesday to discuss its support, seen as vital

The success of the Women’s World Cup won by England on Sunday and watched by millions around the globe has propelled cricket closer to a return to the Olympic Games in 2024. The International Cricket Council is determined to capitalise on recent advances in the women’s game and push on with a bid for Twenty20 competitions, for both genders, to be included. Agreement with the Games is considered closer than ever.

After the World Cup, the ICC recognises how cricket featuring in the Olympics would give the women’s game even greater profile and open up new funding from national governments. There is stronger support for the concept among the ICC’s 104 members than ever before, recognising the opportunity that the Olympics presents.

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup moves cricket closer to Olympic return in 2024

• Popularity of women’s tournament has helped sway the ICC and the IOC
• India’s BCCI will meet on Wednesday to discuss its support, seen as vital

The success of the Women’s World Cup won by England on Sunday and watched by millions around the globe has propelled cricket closer to a return to the Olympic Games in 2024. The International Cricket Council is determined to capitalise on recent advances in the women’s game and push on with a bid for Twenty20 competitions, for both genders, to be included. Agreement with the Games is considered closer than ever.

After the World Cup, the ICC recognises how cricket featuring in the Olympics would give the women’s game even greater profile and open up new funding from national governments. There is stronger support for the concept among the ICC’s 104 members than ever before, recognising the opportunity that the Olympics presents.

Continue reading…

0

County cricket talking points: Ross Whiteley hits six sixes … and loses

Ross Whiteley scored 37 in one over for Worcestershire but David Willey’s 118 helped Yorkshire win the match and climb to the top of their T20 Blast group

By Gary Naylor for the 99.94 Cricket Blog, part of the Guardian Sport Network

Kevin Pietersen’s Surrey (see what I did there) top the South Group after a couple of strange matches at The Oval. On Wednesday, a raucous (but not too raucous) capacity crowd saw him almost single-handedly get Surrey up to 150, a score that proved good enough on a slow pitch exploited with Yorkshire nous by Gareth Batty, whose four overs brought him 2-19. But back to Pietersen, as always seems to be the case. Having been badly dropped at cow corner by Dan Lawrence and “running” like a stiff Alastair Cook, he appeared to decide to hit sixes and five of the match’s eight flew off his bat. In more ways than one, he played like a right-handed version of Chris Gayle – whether that is a good look these days remains to be seen. It worked in this match, no other batsman crossing 30, as Essex fell 11 short of their target.

Continue reading…

0

England beat India in a thrilling Women’s World Cup final – a photo essay

Photographer Tom Jenkins had exclusive access around Lord’s to capture all the action and atmosphere of a dramatic Women’s World Cup cricket final

This was one of the great Lord’s finals and there was a buzz around St John’s Wood before a ball was bowled. On the Wellington Road the ticket touts were out in force and they seemed more eager to buy than sell. Not even Rachel Heyhoe Flint, one of the world’s great optimists and the captain of England in the first World Cup final in 1973 – they were two years ahead of the men – would have dared to envisage this.

Continue reading…

0

Cricket World Cup win seals trailblazing summer of women’s sport

England’s Heather Knight says victory will be transformative for cricket – with Euro 2017 and rugby World Cup action to come

England captain Heather Knight predicted her team’s historic world cup victory will transform the face of cricket in Britain after a pulsating finale at Lord’s in front of the largest crowd ever to watch a women’s game in this country.

More than 27,000 spectators piled into the home of cricket, many of them women and young girls, to witness one of the most remarkable comebacks ever seen at Lord’s, led by 25-year-old Anya Shrubsole.

Continue reading…

0

England beat India in dramatic Women’s Cricket World Cup final – video

England have won the Women’s Cricket World Cup, beating India by nine runs in a thrilling final which could have gone either way. It took a match-winning spell from Anya Shrubsole, with the bowler taking five wickets for just 11 runs at the end, taking the final wicket with just nine balls remaining

Continue reading…

0

Thrilling England win in World Cup final is a great advert for the game | Vic Marks

After two excellent semi-finals, the climax to the tournament provided more fantastic entertainment with the result in doubt until the last ball

It is the women who know how to enthrall. After two riveting semi‑finals in the World Cup here was a final that had a capacity crowd nervously glued to their seats one moment, then leaping out of them in delight yet still never knowing which side would prevail until the final ball was bowled. Somehow the men’s games this summer have been so disappointingly one-sided by comparison.

This was not the decorous Lord’s of seasons past. The fans were chanting and gasping at every twist and turn. In the final overs each ball provoked raucous cheers from one set of fans or the other. Brilliant run-outs, scrambled singles, desperate dropped catches and then at the end – just as in the semi-final at Bristol – Anya Shrubsole was engulfed by team‑mates, exhausted not so much by the demands of the game, but the tension of a magnificent final. One-day cricket is a wonderful game when the outcome seems all-important.

Continue reading…

0

England v India: Women’s World Cup final – live!

10.37am BST

1st over: England 1-0 (Winfield 1, Beaumont 0) Jhulan Goswami, leading ODI wicket-taker, in her last World Cup, gets us underway from the Nursery End. Lauren Winfield, one part of the Bash ‘Em sisters, lets the first ball go by. The roars are over the top. It’s just a dot ball, lads and lasses. I don’t think they care. A single to third man and England, the crowd and this match are underway…

10.30am BST

Right – come at me with your words. Tweet me with at @Vitu_E or go ahead pass on any longer thoughts to my humungous email address, vithushan.ehantharajah.casual@theguardian.com.

Eileen Whelan was given the honour of ringing the bell for the start of play. She played for England, Middlesex and the Civil Service. She says the two things that keep her fit are yoga and wine. She’s 105. There’s a lesson for all of us…

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup 2017: England fully prepared for destructive India

Heather Knight, the England captain, revealed her side’s Saturday evening would be spent watching Love Island as England have done their homework before their momentous final at Lord’s

Both captains entered the Lord’s museum with beaming smiles that broke for a moment as they cast their eyes on the trophy to their left before taking their seats to address the media. Of all the collections in all the cricket grounds, this is one that rarely struggles for attention. Before a momentous Women’s World Cup final between England and India, the trinkets at the Home of Cricket played second fiddle.

India’s captain, Mithali Raj, arrived first, calm and composed before her final World Cup match. There is not much in the game she has not witnessed in an international career that started in England in 1999 and has seen her amass 228 international caps. Contrast that to England captain Heather Knight, whose 74 ODI appearances at 26 years of age hints at a precocious talent that came good when in fact she is only just getting started. Both have young sides at their disposal.

Continue reading…

0

Cricket historian, writer, surgeon, spy: the mad world of Major Rowland Bowen

Once renowned, now forgotten, Major Rowland Bowen was an anarchistic self-amputee who ruffled establishment feathers and re-wrote cricket history

One September afternoon in 1968, Rowland Bowen, a renowned cricket historian and establishment-baiting controversialist, walked into the bathroom of his house in Willingdon Road, Eastbourne, set out a hacksaw, a hammer and a chisel, and sat down in the bathtub. Following instructions gleaned from years of obsessive amateur study, he then set about methodically amputating his own right leg.

Why he did it, nobody was quite sure. Bowen was many remarkable things but he was definitely not a doctor. Neither was there anything wrong with his leg. Years earlier Bowen had lost a finger too. He explained that one away to his remaining friends as an accident; he’d just been careless while chopping up food for the giant hounds that surrounded him as he sat at his typewriter. The term Apotemnophilia – a neurological disorder characterised by an intense and long-standing desire for amputation of a specific limb – was not commonly encountered until a decade later.

Continue reading…

0

Tammy Beaumont: ‘I genuinely doubted whether I was good enough’

The England opener talks about how coaches revived her confidence from rock bottom and helped her become a spearhead of the team’s World Cup challenge

The 2014 World T20 was a dark time for Tammy Beaumont. Having turned 23 on the eve of the tournament, she travelled to Bangladesh as part of an experienced England side and was seen as the person to give the batting some lower-order punch. For once it was a set role, something she has craved since making an international debut keeping wicket and batting at No10 against West Indies in 2009.

England made the final, falling to Australia, but Beaumont failed miserably in the tournament. Four innings returned 10 runs. All in, she faced 28 balls. “I genuinely came home having doubts about whether I was good enough to be an international batter,” she says. “Was I wasting my time?”

Continue reading…

0

Harmanpreet Kaur’s power-hitting takes India past Australia into final

• Women’s World Cup semi-final: India 281-4, Australia 245
• India win by 36 runs and face England in Sunday’s final

In one of the most spectacular innings in limited-overs cricket Harmanpreet Kaur sent India into the World Cup final with an unbeaten 171 from 115 balls, ousting Australia, the favourites and champions.

India will meet England at Lord’s on Sunday in their first 50-over final since 2005, looking to secure their first women’s ICC trophy. The manner of their 36-run victory, along with Kaur’s unrelenting assault, leaves England with much to think about. Remember that India inflicted defeat on England in the opening match of this competition.

Continue reading…

0

Australia v India: Women’s World Cup semi-final – live!

2.13pm BST

6th over: India 21-1 (Raut 10, Raj 3) Very good from Perry, who has rediscovered her bowling touch at the perfect time. Wonder if she fancies the slope at Lord’s on Sunday? Pav End, skip. Meanwhile, this is excellent (context: Raj reckons she’d have a few more runs at a quicker lick if she had more proactive teammates around her):

Mithali Raj batting before today – from about 38 seconds in https://t.co/MENomVPmYi @ajarrodkimber @collinsadam @Vitu_E @FiBollen

2.07pm BST

5th over: India 21-1 (Raut 10, Raj 3) Schutt strays – short and angling down the leg side – and Raut helps her around the corner for four. Over-correction on the next delivery gives a wide on the off-side. When she’s able to bring her line in a bit, Raut sees out the over with a dab inside third man for four. “Wishing MITHALI Raj and the entire team unprecedented success today,” writes Kiran Mavani from Ahmedabad. Thanks for reading in, Kiran. Wouldn’t mind nothing but Raj drives for the next two hours.

Pumped up after that first wicket! #WWC17 #AUSvIND pic.twitter.com/OwHUNWYUaa

Continue reading…

0

Rory McIlroy’s best moments, indoor cricket and expert drone destruction | Classic YouTube

This week’s roundup also features baseball behemoth Aaron Judge, an inspired catch from a cricket fan and a furious bodybuilder

1) With the Open starting, Rory McIlroy isn’t exactly firing on all cylinders. Let’s look back at some happier times, starting in 2007 when he burst on to the scene with a fine performance as an amateur at that year’s Open. Here he is winning the Silver Medal at Carnoustie. McIlroy had to wait a few years for his first major but managed it at the 2011 US Open. Here is the fresh-faced champion being interviewed on the 18th after breaking his duck. The following year he won the US PGA Championship, and did so again in 2014. In the same year he won the Open, this time at Royal Liverpool. Finally, here he is sinking a monster at the Ryder Cup. So Rory, if you’re reading and feeling glum, watch all that and cheer yourself up a bit.

2) Drones may be the first hint of Earth’s dystopian future, but they are no match for an expertly flung toilet roll, as this Argentinian football fan proved:

Continue reading…

0

Women’s World Cup 2017: Meg Lanning back to lead Australia in India semi-final

• Lanning has 328 runs at an average of 109 in this World Cup
• India lost to Australia in their group match

Asked before their Women’s World Cup semi-final against India to reflect on Australia’s World Cup success four years ago, the vice-captain Alex Blackwell had to stop. It didn’t come to her immediately. Filing through her memory, it finally did. “That’s right,” she said. “We won against West Indies.” The veteran of 14 years and eight global tournaments explained the lapse: plenty has happened since. It sure has.

Since they lifted the trophy the leaps taken in the women’s game require stopping to catalogue, too. First and foremost: professionalism. When a new pay deal is eventually signed with Cricket Australia, women internationals will earn $200,000 within five years.

Continue reading…

0

Gary Ballance fractures index finger but says he is ready for third Test

• X-ray reveals minor crack on England batsman’s left index finger
• Mark Stoneman, Dawid Malan and Tom Westley wait in the wings

Gary Ballance suffered a hairline fracture to his left index finger during the defeat to South Africa at Trent Bridge but has told England he is ready to bat in next week’s third Test.

Ballance, who was struck by Morne Morkel during England’s fourth day collapse as the tourists levelled the series, saw the minor crack show up in an x-ray on Tuesday morning but has reported minimal discomfort and claims he is able to grip a bat handle unimpeded. It means his place in the squad for the Oval that will be named at the end of the week will hinge on whether the hand surgeon he was due to see in Leeds later in the day deems it still in need of time off or likely to result in a serious issue if hit there again.

Continue reading…

0

Cricket v tennis: how does Lord’s compare to a day at Wimbledon? | Tim de Lisle

They go head-to-head every year, but who comes out on top in a battle between two of London’s staple summer sporting outings?

The Spin was at the Saturday of the Lord’s Test and even paid for its ticket. A few days later, it was taken to Wimbledon by its Mum. Sitting watching some men’s doubles, it found itself comparing the two experiences. The MCC and the All England Club stage different ball-games but they are venerable London clubs that have become world-famous to the point where their premises are widely regarded as (dread word) iconic. If we make some allowances for apples and oranges, it seems reasonable to weigh them against each other. So here it is: Lord’s v Wimbledon – the showdown.

Continue reading…

0

Cricket v tennis: how does Lord’s compare to a day at Wimbledon? | Tim de Lisle

They go head-to-head every year, but who comes out on top in a battle between two of London’s staple summer sporting outings?

The Spin was at the Saturday of the Lord’s Test and even paid for its ticket. A few days later, it was taken to Wimbledon by its Mum. Sitting watching some men’s doubles, it found itself comparing the two experiences. The MCC and the All England Club stage different ball-games but they are venerable London clubs that have become world-famous to the point where their premises are widely regarded as (dread word) iconic. If we make some allowances for apples and oranges, it seems reasonable to weigh them against each other. So here it is: Lord’s v Wimbledon – the showdown.

Continue reading…