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Category: Baltimore Orioles

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Frank Robinson, hall of famer and MLB’s first black manager, dies aged 83

Robinson broke barriers when he took charge of ClevelandHis 586 home runs stand 10th on baseball’s all-time listHall of famer Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and the only player to win the MVP award in both leagues, has…

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‘Silence is just as bad’: Adam Jones on racism and why athletes must speak out

Baltimore Orioles center fielder Adam Jones has called on athletes to speak out for what they stand for amid a turbulent month that saw the five-times All-Star targeted by racist slurs during a game at Fenway Park.

Jones, 31, made the remarks in a wide-ranging interview with Yahoo Sports published on Tuesday.

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MLB needs to act on beanballs – but we should know better

Last week’s beanball war between the Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles cast a harsh light on Major League Baseball’s toxic approach to violence

The absurdity of Major League Baseball’s beanball culture reached a peak during last week’s Red Sox-Orioles series. Boston entered the series with its hurlers still angry at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado, who inadvertently clipped Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia with a slide in their previous series. Matt Barnes and Chris Sale threw at Machado over the clubs’ next few meetings, only for Machado to punish those attempts with an RBI double and a home run respectively.

But Machado was mad following Sale’s brushback attempt in the second game of their most recent series this past Tuesday. After the game, he vented to reporters. “Pitchers out there with fucking balls in their hands, throwing 100mph trying to hit people,” Machado said. “And I’ve fucking got a bat too. I could go out there and crush somebody if I wanted to. But you know what, I’d get suspended for a year and the pitcher only gets suspended for two games. That’s not cool.”

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MLB needs to act on beanballs – but we should know better

Last week’s beanball war between the Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles cast a harsh light on Major League Baseball’s toxic approach to violence

The absurdity of Major League Baseball’s beanball culture reached a peak during last week’s Red Sox-Orioles series. Boston entered the series with its hurlers still angry at Orioles third baseman Manny Machado, who inadvertently clipped Sox second baseman Dustin Pedroia with a slide in their previous series. Matt Barnes and Chris Sale threw at Machado over the clubs’ next few meetings, only for Machado to punish those attempts with an RBI double and a home run respectively.

But Machado was mad following Sale’s brushback attempt in the second game of their most recent series this past Tuesday. After the game, he vented to reporters. “Pitchers out there with fucking balls in their hands, throwing 100mph trying to hit people,” Machado said. “And I’ve fucking got a bat too. I could go out there and crush somebody if I wanted to. But you know what, I’d get suspended for a year and the pitcher only gets suspended for two games. That’s not cool.”

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Skepticism over racism shows some Red Sox fans don’t know Boston’s history

Adam Jones had to endure racist slurs at Fenway Park earlier this week, and it raised uncomfortable questions for not only Boston but baseball itself

On Tuesday night at Fenway Park, Adam Jones received a standing ovation from the Red Sox fans during his first at-bat. It wasn’t an entirely spontaneous act, but rather an orchestrated “mea culpa” from the Red Sox organization to the Orioles outfielder, who was the target of racial slurs from a section of fans the previous night. It was a nice gesture, coupled by apologies from both the organization and the city itself, but the truth is that Monday’s incident has raised pressing issues that won’t be settled by a symbolic act.

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Orioles’ Adam Jones says he was racially abused by Red Sox fans at Fenway Park

  • Center fielder says he was called N-word and had peanuts thrown at him
  • Boston and Baltimore have prickly history in recent times

Orioles center fielder Adam Jones said he was taunted with racial slurs at Fenway Park during Baltimore’s game against the Boston Red Sox on Monday night.

Jones, who is black, said someone in the crowd threw a bag of peanuts at him. He said he had been the subject of racist heckling in Boston’s ballpark before, but this was one of the worst cases of fan abuse he had heard in his 12-year career, according to USA Today Sports. The five-time All-Star said he was “called the N-word a handful of times”.

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Baseball in 2016: from Cubs win! to Scully’s sayonara, 10 memorable moments

Another year of baseball is gone, goodbye: David Lengel takes a look back at the best, worst and most controversial moments of the 2016 season

It was Game 7 of the World Series, and baseball history was busy pulling the Chicago Cubs back into a boiling cauldron of curses. Rajai Davis’ eighth inning, game-tying home run off the Cubs’ Aroldis Chapman had turned Cleveland’s Progressive Field into a mosh pit, with slightly fewer title-starved Indians fans ripping off their shirts in frenetic celebrations.

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Why protesting against the anthem is the ultimate sin in Major League Baseball

In a sport where patriotisim makes up the fabric of the game, Adam Jones is right to be concerned. Plus, three cheers for Yasiel Puig, Big Papi prepares to bow out, and Joe Maddon rides the Cowboy

Adam Jones works in a city that continues to experience racial upheaval, so perhaps it’s no coincidence that baseball’s most outspoken player on African American social issues calls Baltimore home.

Baseball is the sport that helped break barriers for black people across the United States, starting with Jackie Robinson’s debut in 1947. Nearly 70 years later, the participation of African Americans in the game, on the field as players, in the dugout as managers and in front offices as executives – where progress was always slower – is giving away the gains. Jones, who has spoken out before on racial issues, has little company: a lonely voice in a depleted sea of African American players.

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Adam Jones: no anthem protests in MLB because baseball is ‘a white man’s sport’

  • Baltimore Orioles outfielder gives views on Colin Kaepernick
  • Says smaller number of black players in baseball makes a difference

Baltimore Orioles outfielder Adam Jones says baseball players haven’t joined 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in his national anthem protest because they are concerned about losing their jobs.

In an interview with USA Today, Jones said: “Baseball is a white man’s sport.”

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Adam Jones: no anthem protests in MLB because baseball is ‘a white man’s sport’

  • Baltimore Orioles outfielder gives views on Colin Kaepernick
  • Says smaller number of black players in baseball makes a difference

Baltimore Orioles outfielder Adam Jones says baseball players haven’t joined 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick in his national anthem protest because they are concerned about losing their jobs.

In an interview with USA Today, Jones said: “Baseball is a white man’s sport.”

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Orioles’ Manny Machado charges mound to ignite bench-clearing brawl

  • Tempers flare in fifth inning of Baltimore’s victory over Kansas City
  • Royals’ Yordano Ventura and Orioles’ Manny Machado both ejected

Manny Machado had no intention of taking a 99mph fastball in the back without retaliating.

So when the inevitable occurred, the Orioles young infielder charged the mound with his fists clenched.

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Why the Mets’ Matt Harvey has earned the right to be mediocre

Harvey hasn’t even been that, but if he can recover to a middling level, that will be enough fo New York in 2016. Plus happy birthday Big Sexy, Donald Trump is green all over, another Marlins mess, and more

Charles in New Jersey thinks Matt Harvey drinks too much while on the town flaunting his shoe collection, while Ron in Queens thinks Harvey has developed a bad habit of cupping the ball during his delivery. From talk radio to the broadcast booth to bleachers around baseball, fans and media in New York and beyond are trying to solve the sudden demise of the Dark Knight. It’s his weight, it’s the blood clot, it’s his attitude, it’s the lingering psychological impact of failing after convincing his manager to send him out for the ninth inning in Game 5 of the World Series, and of course, it’s his body’s blowback from a busy 2015 post-surgery season.

Matt Harvey, a franchise cornerstone who once lit up Flushing’s darkest days, who was once an undisputed ace, who was just mere outs away from that Fall Classic performance for the ages, hasn’t hit rock bottom, even if it may have seemed like it on Tuesday night in Washington. The Nats discovered that his third time through the lineup is a charm: ex-teammate Daniel Murphy and company teed off the righty, just as they did during Harvey’s prior start, a performance that has led to even more speculation.

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Why some players wonder if Jake Arrieta is making history or make-believe

A healthy cynicism of Arrieta’s otherworldly achievements is good for the game. Plus, Maeda-mania draws near, Rob Manfred takes on the Goose and Thor takes Manhattan

Jake Arrieta is hearing whispers about magic pills, and they’re coming from within.

Arrieta says there are folks around the league, colleagues, who wonder about a pitcher who transforms from just another prospect who couldn’t harness his stuff to 15-0 with a 0.65 ERA in 17 prior starts. They wonder a little more when they take it back 24 starts: 20-1. 0.86 ERA with 91 hits allowed over 178 innings, 173 strikeouts, 33 walks and 0.697 WHIP cream that goes well with a pair of no-hit cherries on top.

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Why it’s time to stop whining about MLB’s new slide rule | David Lengel

Baseball’s brass are sticking to their new rules to protect sitting duck shortstops and second basemen. Plus, a new party room for the Cubs, Vin Scully is honored while the Orioles and Nats start off streaking

Human beings crave the familiar: almost anything that disrupts routine stresses us out in a major way. When Guardian readers woke up to a spanking new, re-launched website last year, they filled feedback forms with protest. A new iPhone operating system is released and forums quickly flood with complaints. Facebook updates its app, and the sky is falling. Then, at some point, and we can’t really say exactly when or why this happens, the new becomes the normal and everything is just fine, setting up the reaction for the next change (rinse and repeat).

Related: Bryce Harper will make baseball fun again. You better believe it | DJ Gallo

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Baseball’s top 10 of 2015, from KC’s royal masterpiece to the mesmerizing Mets

With another year of baseball is in the books, David Lengel takes a look back at the best, worst and most controversial moments of the 2015 season

Around 20 minutes after closer Wade Davis struck out the Mets’ Wilmer Flores in the bottom of the 12th inning of Game 5, dozens of friends and family of the newly crowned Kansas City Royals were stationed on the field, waiting for their World Series champs. A champagne-drenched Mike Moustakas emerged from the clubhouse, spotted his wife, and delivered an all conquering leg-lifting hug. “I told you” said KC’s third baseman. Moustakas never had any doubt about the outcome. His manager, Ned Yost, had no doubt. His teammates had no doubt.

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Baseball’s top 10 of 2015, from KC’s royal masterpiece to the mesmerizing Mets

With another year of baseball is in the books, David Lengel takes a look back at the best, worst and most controversial moments of the 2015 season

Around 20 minutes after closer Wade Davis struck out the Mets’ Wilmer Flores in the bottom of the 12th inning of Game 5, dozens of friends and family of the newly crowned Kansas City Royals were stationed on the field, waiting for their World Series champs. A champagne-drenched Mike Moustakas emerged from the clubhouse, spotted his wife, and delivered an all conquering leg-lifting hug. “I told you” said KC’s third baseman. Moustakas never had any doubt about the outcome. His manager, Ned Yost, had no doubt. His teammates had no doubt.

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New York Mets fans win the World Series … of bad grammar

As if losing seven of their previous eight games wasn’t enough, Mets fans now find themselves in the basement of MLG – that’s Major League Grammar

It’s another day, and another kick in the teeth for fans of the New York Mets.

After riding high in April, the Mets have been shot down in May and June while their morose lineup continues to drag the team into an offensive abyss. Their injury-depleted roster, one loaded with rookies, has scored just 11 runs in their previous eight games, sending their fans to the talk radio airwaves in a panic, demanding that something, anything, be done by their general manager Sandy Alderson, in order to save a season that once looked incredibly promising after a blistering 14-4 start.

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Why the Oakland Athletics may rather be lucky than good

Billy Beane’s last place Oakland A’s are the unluckiest team in baseball, but reaching the playoffs is not out of the question

By now, baseball fans are overly familiar with Billy Beane’s theory on the Major League Baseball playoffs. The Oakland A’s general manager maintains the post-season is a crapshoot – a tournament based on luck that any team is capable of winning. If it’s true, then Beane has been one of the unluckiest executives in recent history, with his team exiting before reaching the American League Championship stage in each of the last three seasons, and seven of the A’s prior eight post-season appearances going back to 2000.

Now it seems Beane’s bad luck is spreading to the regular season.

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The MLB trade deadline could be a bust – but expect a scramble for Cole Hamels

The only sure thing is that Philadelphia remain in the driving seat as long as they have Cole Hamels. Elsewhere, expect even more low-level trades than last year

It could be one of the best trade deadlines in recent memory. Or absolutely nothing of note could happen, and we could once again be left cursing GMs for not trading away their futures for a big splash. If I had to guess, however, I’d say on the whole it ends up looking vaguely like other recent deadlines – but perhaps with even more low-level buying, selling, and spare-part swapping in the weeks leading up to July 31.

We should get one thing out of the way first: the Philadelphia Phillies were not only right not to trade Cole Hamels over the winter, a fair number of you out there probably owe some Phillies fans – or at the very least, common sense – an apology. Hamels isn’t the best pitcher in the NL this year (that goes to some slate of Max Scherzer, Jake deGrom, and Zack Greinke – yes, Greinke, not Kershaw – arranged as you see it) but he is the best pitcher in the NL, and possibly all of baseball, who is liable to be moving. And whereas everyone was screaming for Philadelphia to ship him off to Boston for guys from their third or fourth tier of prospects over the winter – and some people even saying Philadelphia should eat money on what’s quite a reasonable contract in this pitching market, with Hamels owed $23.5m over each of the next three years with a vesting option on the fourth, the Phillies have interest league-wide now from New York, Texas, Houston (Hamels would apparently block a trade here), and all sorts of places that aren’t Boston.

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An ode to Bartolo Colón – an entertaining everyman, but a winning one

Soon to be 42 years of age, Bartolo Colón has shifted from one-time trade bait to indispensable for the Mets

Tuesday night baseball can be a tough sell in May, but those venturing out to the ballpark in Queens have a bounce in their step. Memories of the Mets magical early-season 11-game winning streak may have given way to a more familiar malaise, seven losses in 10 games. And the offense, playing without its main cog in David Wright, failed to score in 18 innings after back-to-back 1-0 shutouts by the Washington Nationals. Still, it’s a perfect night for baseball, with a cozy, summer-like humidity blanketing the ballpark, and even better, their beloved unlikely hero, Bartolo Colón, is pitching as the home team faces the Baltimore Orioles. Lately at least, that virtually guarantees a fun night by all.

Overheard in Flushing…

I bet you he doesn’t even stretch!

If his helmet comes off it’s a good night.

He’s like a cat out there. Where’s his gold glove?

He’s a warrior.

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