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Author Archive for Letters

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Sir Matt Busby airbrushed from Liverpool FC history? | Brief letters

Upskirting | Sir Matt Busby | Sign language | Vegetarianism | Thameslink | Clive JamesOnce the law is eventually passed to class upskirting as the criminal offence it clearly is (Upskirting bill is blocked by single Tory objection, 16 June), can the po…

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Football: it’s a funny old racist, money-grabbing game | Letters

Readers on the dearth of non-white managers, Amazon’s entry to the broadcasting Premier League, rail seating at football grounds, and the World CupWe have no doubt at all that there are many white men in football who react adversely to “outspoken black…

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When the Kop worshipped a saint | Brief letters

Arthur C Clarke | Vegan tropes | Hadrian’s Wall | Honoured Liverpool FC players | Morris MinorsAs with so many things, Arthur C Clarke foresaw the contamination of other worlds (Letters, 14 June) in his short story Before Eden, published in Amazing&nbs…

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Neville Southall as a source of hope | Brief letters

Manchester town hall | Funeral ads | Atheist appeals to God | Neville Southall | Dom BessWhile I am broadly in agreement with Simon Jenkins about the government getting it wrong on urban renewal in the regions (Relocating a few TV execs won’t revive ou…

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Another line in the David Beckham tattoo saga | Brief letters

Michael Martin | Sajid Javid’s pose | Crossword clue | David Beckham’s tattoo | SpellcheckerYou report that Lord Martin (Obituary, 30 April) was the last Speaker of the House of Commons to resign “since Sir John Trevor in 1695”. This is, to put it kind…

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David Beckham’s tattoos are just fine in Hindi | Brief letters

David Beckham’s Sanskrit | Apple autocorrection | Street names | Keeping meetings brief | Windrush alePlease can we sink for ever the notion of David Beckham’s “misspelt Sanskrit/Hindi tattoo” (Inking big: is Becks “addicted” to tats?, G2, 2 May)? Both…

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Wembley stadium and lessons from cricket for the FA | Letters

Readers including former FA chief executive Graham Kelly respond to news that the FA is considering selling Wembley to Fulham owner Shahid Khan in a £900m dealDavid Conn’s report on the Football Association’s proposal to sell Wembley (Sport, 27 April) …

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Ray Wilkins had clever feet and a clever mind | Brief letters

London’s gang violence | Mo Mowlam | Ray Wilkins | Spring lambs | Easter bunnies | KakuroWhen is someone going to notice that gang violence only occurs where there is acute poverty (Police ‘have lost control of the streets’, 6 April)? Or is that too bi…

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The state of 21st-century football | Letters

In his day, skinhead thuggery was endemic and football hard men stalked every match in his day, writes Richard Tippett. It’s the teenage daughter of Carragher’s target I feel sorry for, writes Joe McCarthyI laughed at almost every line of Anthony Clava…

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When did football become a spitfest? | Brief letters

Footballers | Italian taxes | Extrajudicial killings | Mnemonics | Pie | Frozen pipesOn football past and present (Letters, 7 March), one particularly unpleasant feature of today’s game is the compulsive spitting. Watching Match of the Day now is to ob…

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Qatar’s World Cup, Pep Guardiola and the right to wear a yellow ribbon | Letters

Eddie Hapgood’s daugher Lynne Hapgood on the story behind the 1938 Berlin salute. Plus Justin Horton and John Clark on the Manchester City manager’s affiliationsRichard Williams (Ribbons and salutes, Sport, 27 February) is right in asserting that “hist…

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Still feeling the pain of the Munich air disaster | Letters

Readers respond to coverage of the 60th anniversary of the plane crash that killed eight Manchester United players, three of the team’s staff, eight journalists and four othersI read with sadness the articles about the Munich air disaster 60 years…

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Nice one Cyril came before Nice one Cyrille | Brief letters

Cyril Knowles and Cyrille Regis | Preston | Capita | Racecards | Red-top GuardianAs a Coventry City supporter, I too sang “Nice one Cyrille” back in the days (Tears and tributes for trailblazer Cyrille Regis, 31 January). However, as an academic I feel…

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What is the point of super-rich football? | Letters

Just six clubs – Manchester City, Barcelona, Real Madrid, Bayern Munich, Juventus and Paris-Saint German – dominate European football, writes Will GobleBarney Ronay’s excellent article about Neymar (Sport, 20 January) sums up all that is wrong with mod…

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Mata may be a very good boy, but does he pay his taxes? | Brief letters

Freemasons in the police | Footballer of the Year | Drunk tanks | Storm DylanUrgent action is needed if the national spokesman for the Freemasons says they are a parallel organisation who “fit into” the police (Freemasons are blocking reform, says poli…

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Road safety tips from Half Man Half Biscuit | Letters

Liverpool FC | Public sector workers | Royal parks | Keeping 2 Chevrons Apart | Thatcher’s panda phobiaAs a lifelong Stockport County supporter, I’d have more sympathy with Southampton fans bemoaning another player leaving for Liverpool (Letters, 29 De…

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Sepp Blatter is wrong. Whistleblowers are courageous and deserve our support | Letters

To compare whistleblowers to tattling children is misguided, says Erika Kelton. They are vital in helping to expose wrongdoing

Sepp Blatter’s comments about whistleblowers in David Conn’s interview are woefully misguided, but unfortunately not uncommon (Sepp Blatter after the fall: ‘Why the hell should I bear all the blame?’, 19 June). In the interview, Blatter compared whistleblowers to a child “who was a whistleblower towards the tutor” and implied they were the problem and deserved some sort of punishment for raising concerns of wrongdoing. Whistleblowing comes in many forms, and all whistleblowers deserve more respect than comparing them to tattling youngsters. Thanks to whistleblowers, nefarious schemes that have cheated taxpayers and investors, and even endangered lives, have been brought to light. Experienced and well-qualified individuals often risk their careers, and sometimes their lives, to expose and stop wrongdoing.

But views like those of Mr Blatter, or actions like the recent attempted outing of a whistleblower by Barclays CEO Jes Staley, are representative of a significant portion of the business community who think employees should be seen and not heard. In the US, whistleblowers are a key contributor to regulators’ fight against fraud and corruption. Each year whistleblowers are responsible for helping recover billions stolen and lost to fraudulent business practices. Let’s hope the Blatters and Staleys of the world don’t deter the brave individuals who muster the courage to speak up.
Erika A Kelton
Phillips & Cohen LLP, Washington DC

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The semiotics of Sepp Blatter’s beef with white wine | Letters

Police officers and their pay | James Bond and the former Fifa president | Going tabloid in the 19th century | Borrowings by Robert Louis Stevenson and Bob Dylan | From Trump Street into Russia Row

Your editorial on public sector pay (Nurses teachers and firefighters are long overdue a rise, 20 June) was disappointing for a couple of reasons. First, you exclude police officers from the headline, when they have suffered similar pay freezes and cuts, compounded by pay-scale freezes and the largest raid on pensions. Second, you use the sexist term “policemen” when referring to officers running into danger – are you suggesting policewomen run the other way? The perfectly respectable gender-neutral alternatives “officer” and “constable” have been in satisfactory use for many decades.
DCI Louise Fleckney
Broughton, Northamptonshire

James Bond in From Russia with Love, to his enemy Donald “Red” Grant: “Red wine with fish. Well, that should have told me something.” Sepp Blatter, lunching with David Conn (G2, 19 June), ordered white wine with côte de bœuf. Doesn’t that tell us something?
Clifton Melvin
Chalfont St Giles, Buckinghamshire

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When Old Etonians won the FA Cup | Brief letters

Football in private schools | Welsh history | Police as protectors | Plastic bag recycling

On Cup final day, I enjoyed reading DJ Taylor’s article on the football novel (Review, 27 May). However, in discussing the first wave of football fiction, largely describing boys’ school stories, he noted that their “real-life, public-school attending equivalents would, of course, have played rugby”. This perpetuates the error, which I thought had been laid to rest, that independent schools shunned football. As an example, before professionalism took hold, Old Etonians contested no fewer than six FA Cup finals, winning two of them. One of their losses was against Old Carthusians.
Ed Lilley
Bristol

• Comforting though it is to see that Oxford students will have to study for exams on “non-British, non-European” topics (Report, 29 May), I wonder whether they might consider studying non-English “British” topics? What does the average student know, for instance, about the Rebecca Riots, the Treason of the Blue Books, Tryweryn, Senghennydd, Pont Trefechan? But then it’s only Wales, so it doesn’t matter, does it?
Dr Meg Elis
Caernarfon, Gwynedd

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Up for the cup with the best tea in Europe | Brief letters

Celtic’s 1967 European Cup victory | Collapsing climbing routes | Terrific tennis reporting | New names for honours | Grandparents’ nicknames

Like many Scots of a certain vintage, I can recall exactly where I was and what I was doing when Celtic won the European Cup on 25 May 1967 (Lisbon Lions allowed Scotland to walk tall again, Sport, 24 May). Too impecunious to go to Lisbon, I was glued to my parents’ small black and white TV in Glasgow. In common with a number of my friends, I had decided to abstain from alcohol for the duration of the match in order not to impair my viewing faculties. So it is that I vividly remember the cup of tea I was drinking hitting the ceiling when Celtic scored the winning goal and became the immortal Lisbon Lions.
Mike Pender
Cardiff

• Perhaps we should have foreseen the collapse of the Hillary Step on Everest (Opinion, 24 May). I recall vividly the Gendarme on the Cuillin ridge of Skye and the vital chock stone in the Flake Crack on Scafell’s Central Buttress route, for years England’s most classic hard rock climb. Sadly both features now form part of the screes below. Miraculously, Nape’s Needle, the most iconic of them all, still stands proud on the crags of Great Gable. First climbed in 1886, it has taken a pounding ever since.
Richard Gilbert
York

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