rss

Author Archive for Helen Davidson

0

He’s free, but who’s to blame for Hakeem al-Araibi’s ordeal?

Campaigners examine whether the failings of Interpol, Australian police, the world’s footballing bodies and Thai authorities allowed the refugee athlete to fall into Bahrain’s webAs Hakeem al-Araibi settles back into his life in Melbourne after 76 days…

0

Hakeem Al-Araibi: Thailand to free Bahraini footballer

Thai authorities drop extradition case against refugee, meaning he can return to Australia The Bahraini footballer Hakeem al-Araibi is set to return to Australia after Thai authorities withdrew an extradition case against him.The surprise decision on M…

0

Australia urges Thailand to use its powers to free Hakeem al-Araibi

Request comes as Thai prosecutor confirms country’s attorney general has authority to override court processThe Australian government has renewed demands for the release of Hakeem al-Araibi after the Thai prosecutor publicly confirmed the government ha…

0

Hakeem al-Araibi faces further 60 days in Thai jail after extradition hearing

Refugee footballer arrived shackled and barefoot for hearing on Bahrain extradition requestRefugee footballer Hakeem al-Araibi has been given 60 days to prepare a defence against Bahrain’s attempt to extradite him from Thailand.The 25-year-old will rem…

0

Hakeem al-Araibi’s wife begs Canada and NZ for help and says ‘time is running out’

Exclusive: Wife of Bahraini refugee asks leaders to pressure Thai authorities to release her husband“Time is running out” for Hakeem al-Araibi, his wife has written in letters to the leaders of Canada and New Zealand, pleading with them for help to see…

0

Hakeem al-Araibi’s detention not Sheikh Salman’s responsibility, AFC says

Asian Football Confederation, which has come under fire for failing to call for the refugee footballer’s release, says its president was recused from overseeing the region 18 months ago The Asian Football Confederation claims its president, Sheikh Salm…

0

Call for Fifa’s Salman al-Khalifa to step down if Hakeem al-Araibi is not freed

World Players Association questions why there has been no statement from the football body’s vice-president Sheikh Salman al-Khalifa should be disqualified from his positions as vice-president of Fifa and president of the Asian Football Confederation (…

0

Transgender weightlifter Laurel Hubbard’s eligibility under scrutiny

No official objection lodged against Kiwi athlete, but other teams at Commonwealth Games said they felt it was unfair New Zealand weightlifter Laurel Hubbard went into the women’s +90kg finals at the Commonwealth Games as favourite, expected not only t…

0

Indian Commonwealth Games ‘imposters’ detained at Brisbane airport

One man charged with people smuggling and falsifying documents after eight claim to be journalistsA group of Indian nationals has been arrested and detained as “imposters” claiming to be journalists covering the Commonwealth Games.The Australian Border…

0

‘Stranger things have happened’: Rovers prepare to meet Sydney FC in Darwin | Helen Davidson

The FFA Cup draw has thrown up a classic David and Goliath encounter between part-time players from the tropics and the three-time A-League champions

On a Tuesday evening Darwin Rovers are getting some extra training in at a suburban Darwin oval. They started late because some players hadn’t finished work, and they’re sharing the dying light with a few other sporting groups.

But every session helps ahead of the biggest game of their lives this week, against the reigning A-League champions, Sydney FC.

Continue reading…

0

‘I don’t want to be here’: Nick Kyrgios wilts in the heat of a Davis Cup tie

All players struggle in steamy Darwin for the world group quarter-final, but social media accuses Kyrgios of tanking before he has even changed his shirt

Read the match report

With a cry of “I don’t want to be here” it seemed like tennis star Nick Kyrgios might be displaying his increasingly trademark bad behaviour, after a third set tiebreak in a nailbiting Davis Cup quarterfinal match against Aleksandr Nedovyesov of Kazakhstan.

All eyes were on the 20-year-old Kyrgios at Marrara Sport Complex in Darwin on Friday, in his first outing since Wimbledon where he was slammed for his on-court behaviour.

Continue reading…

0

Indigenous athletics camp strikes balance between education and sport

Mentors including Senator Nova Peris, 800m record holder Alex Rowe and long jumper Robbie Crowther will pass on tips to students from around Australia Continue reading…

0

Indigenous athletics camp strikes balance between education and sport

Mentors including Senator Nova Peris, 800m record holder Alex Rowe and long jumper Robbie Crowther will pass on tips to students from around Australia

A group of Indigenous high school students from remote parts of Australia are visiting Melbourne this week for a three-day athletics camp to learn about balancing studies with training.

The inaugural Raise the Bar summer camp program, a partnership between Athletics Australia and Melbourne University, offers Indigenous students from remote and regional areas the chance to learn from some of the country’s highest achievers in sport.

Continue reading…

0

Indigenous athletics camp strikes balance between education and sport

Mentors including Senator Nova Peris, 800m record holder Alex Rowe and long jumper Robbie Crowther will pass on tips to students from around Australia

A group of Indigenous high school students from remote parts of Australia are visiting Melbourne this week for a three-day athletics camp to learn about balancing studies with training.

The inaugural Raise the Bar summer camp program, a partnership between Athletics Australia and Melbourne University, offers Indigenous students from remote and regional areas the chance to learn from some of the country’s highest achievers in sport.

Continue reading…

0

Indigenous athletics camp strikes balance between education and sport

Mentors including Senator Nova Peris, 800m record holder Alex Rowe and long jumper Robbie Crowther will pass on tips to students from around Australia

A group of Indigenous high school students from remote parts of Australia are visiting Melbourne this week for a three-day athletics camp to learn about balancing studies with training.

The inaugural Raise the Bar summer camp program, a partnership between Athletics Australia and Melbourne University, offers Indigenous students from remote and regional areas the chance to learn from some of the country’s highest achievers in sport.

Continue reading…

0

Cricketer Phillip Hughes dies two days after being hit by ball during match

Continue reading…

0

Magazine sorry for ‘racially offensive’ description of Indigenous surfer

Surfing Life issues unreserved apology for article that describes Otis Carey’s face as ‘apeish’



0

Israeli embassy in US tweets in support of SodaStream and Scarlett Johansson

Official Israeli embassy Twitter account retweets SodaStream Superbowl ad shortly after it aired, adding the words ‘Love this, & Scarlett Johansson’

0

Super Bowl: Australian film-maker’s Doritos ad in running for US$1m

Sticky orange fingers the inspiration for commercial that has racked up 2m views on YouTube

An Australian film-maker will be a keen spectator at the US Super Bowl – but it will be the half-time break rather than the sport that will keep him on tenterhooks. It could make him US$1 million (A$1.1 million) richer.

Thomas Noakes’s entry into the Doritos Crash the SuperBowl competition to make a commercial for the chip brand has put him firmly in the running for the cash prize, and has racked up nearly two million views on YouTube.

Noakes will not know until the chosen ad airs midway through the gridiron showpiece on February 2 whether he has won.

He has come up with a unique, if slightly off-putting, take on the Doritos side-effect: sticky orange fingers.

“It’s silly, really. We just thought of a machine that cleans fingers,” Noakes told Guardian Australia.

“Like magical machines, and Willy Wonka and all those references. But then I thought it would be funny if it wasn’t so magical and it was just a mundane office worker on the other side.”

That mundane office worker, played by Renzo Bellato, has the stomach-turning task of sucking clean the fingers that the character Billy, played by Sam Glissan, pokes through the wall.

There are no special effects, and no “stunt fingers”, says Noakes. Also, it took 10 takes.

“On the 10th take, man, I couldn’t see him, but Belinda [Dean], the producer, was standing there and on the 10th take she said Sam just dropped his head and shuddered, his face white,” said Noakes.

“The guy is a dedicated actor. I’d struggle doing it. He struggled doing it. I cannot speak highly enough of the actors involved.”

The Doritos competition opened up to international entrants for the first time, and Noakes said the team were “humbly grateful” to be contenders.

Noakes will attend the Super Bowl as a guest of Doritos along with the other finalists. They will see when the half-time ads are shown on the big screen whose entry made it.

“The screening audience of the Super Bowl is five times the actual population of Australia. It’s bananas,” said Noakes.

“The other entries are amazing. We’re humbled and grateful to be among those other entries.”

A 30-second ad spot in the half-time break of the NFL game can command about $4 million.

theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds



0

Australian cricketers draw thousands for triumphant victory celebration

Captain Michael Clarke thanks fans packed into the Opera House forecourt as focus turns to next test in South Africa

Thousands of cricket fans filled the Sydney Opera House forecourt on Tuesday to celebrate Australia’s Ashes victory over England and hear from the winning team.

The crowd cheered as each player was introduced.

The prime minister spoke first. When greeted by a cry of ”Go back to Canberra, you drongo!”, Tony Abbott joked that his heckler might be a member of England’s ”Barmy Army”.

“In Australia summer means cricket,” he said. ”A good summer means Australia playing England.

”You made the improbable achievable,” he told the team. ”Now we want you to become the invincibles by going on to beat South Africa,” looking ahead to the team’s next Test series.

The crowd erupted when Mitchell Johnson was asked if he would keep his luxuriant moustache. The cheers turned to boos, though, when he said, ”I’m actually going to shave it.”

But he quickly reassured the crowd: ”I’m going to grow it back again. I’ll grow it for South Africa.”

There was some controversy over sledging on the pitch during the series, but Johnson said banter between sides was ”all part of the game”.

He acknowledged England’s supporters had given him a hard time, but: ”It was nice to turn around and put the five fingers up.”

Captain Michael Clarke thanked the crowd, and said he was ”extremely proud” of the team. “The support we’ve had throughout this series … we really feel that as players,” he said.

“Hopefully we put smiles on some faces.”

The team was presented with a Waterford Crystal Ashes trophy to a backdrop of fireworks and a toot of support from a passing Manly ferry.

Coach Darren Lehmann, who has been widely praised for turning Australia’s form around, said all credit went to the players. “They’ve done all the hard work,” he said.

But now it was time to get back to work.

“I think the boys need a bit of training after the last few days,” he said.

Asked about the series in South Africa, which will follow more battles with England in the one-day and Twenty20 forms of the game, Lehmann said: “First thing is to get through the one-dayers.

“Then [we will] move forward from here, obviously, against the number one Test-playing nation in their home backyard. So it’s a great learning curve for us. We’ll have to play well.”

After the presentation, players signed autographs and took photos with fans. Clarke told reporters the team had been “celebrating well” and added: “It’s great to see so many people out here today.”

Organisers expected about 4,000 supporters to turn up. About five minutes before the players arrived the front half of the audience area was closed.

One person in the crowd, Michael Klaassen, had come to see the team because “it’s a hell of an achievement winning five-nil in an Ashes series”.

“It’s a once-in-a-lifetime thing to come out here really,” he said.

He had brought a shirt to get signed for himself, a hat for a mate and a program he was hoping Clarke would sign for his mother-in-law.

Sonia Hatvarny and a friend made their way from Manly with nine excited children. One of them, Brodie, 7, said he had watched as much of the series as he could. His favourite player? “David Warner, because he’s a good batter.”

theguardian.com © 2014 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds