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Author Archive for Andy Bull at Edgbaston

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Archer and Rashid the precious cogs in England’s World Cup machine | Andy Bull

For England to have a fast bowler that menacing is unusual, for them to have a wrist spinner that deadly is almost unprecedented as Australia found to their cost in the semi-finalSome strange daydream, this, a child’s idea of what an England win might …

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Ben Stokes takes centre stage to give England edge over Kohli and India

All-rounder shows his knack for grabbing match-winning opportunities as his bowling seals victory in tense finaleIn every match there are the moments that matter just that much more, when all the idle chatter stops, and some spectators fall silent whil…

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Sam Curran’s impetuous brilliance keeps England’s hopes alive | Andy Bull

After his senior colleagues had faltered the young all-rounder took the fight to the Indian bowlers in swashbuckling styleOf course it is the hope that kills you. Anyone who has followed England long enough knows that. Which was why the thousands of fa…

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Jimmy Anderson edges duel but Virat Kohli still scales mountain | Andy Bull

The world’s best Test bowler had the No 1 batsman’s measure for much of the second day of the first Test yet India’s captain punished England’s other bowlers in scoring 149Virat Kohli does not care to talk about the 2014 tour any more. After four years…

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Yorkshire’s special day – out of many – turns out to be a mixed occasion | Andy Bull

Players from the county dominated the Test build-up and first day but a run out and dropped bear summed everything upIt was Yorkshire Day on Wednesday, a rare opportunity for those of us unlucky enough to be born in the other 47 counties to hear Yorksh…

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Jermaine Blackwood gives West Indies hope despite absent friends | Andy Bull

Touring side’s innings defeat by England highlighted absence of Chris Gayle, Darren Bravo and more, but Blackwood showed all is not lost

There will be a few reasons to remember this game, the first day-night Test held in England, but none of them will have anything much to do with the cricket played by West Indies. Alastair Cook batted for longer in the one innings he played than their 11 batsmen managed in 22 innings between them. On Saturday West Indies lost 19 wickets in the day. It wasn’t even spectacularly bad cricket. There was no dramatic collapse, just a grim and inevitable subsidence. You would get a better contest watching a steamroller go over wet tarmac. This is a callow West Indies team, young to enough to learn, yes, but young enough to get scarred, too. And it is hard to believe a defeat like this will do them any good.

Related: England overwhelm West Indies as Stuart Broad passes Ian Botham’s mark

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Hungry Alastair Cook works up an appetite for West Indies’ buffet bowling | Andy Bull

England batsman was quite happy to leave a lot of what the tourists served, certain as he was that something altogether more tempting would soon appear

There was a moment, early on the first afternoon of this Test, when the West Indian attack threatened England’s batsmen. It came when Tom Westley was dismissed lbw, and England were 39 for two. By midway through the match’s second day, as over followed over, hour followed hour, session followed session, that moment started to feel as thought it was a very long time ago indeed. Alastair Cook’s batting can have that effect. Cook’s score rolled on, as inexorable as the tide and just about as fast-moving too. Jason Holder, West Indies’ young skipper, played Canute, powerless to send Cook back. He faced 407 balls altogether, in nine hours and 22 minutes of unruffled batting, dismissed, in the end, when he lost concentration and missed a straight ball.

Related: Alastair Cook’s mighty 243 puts England firmly in control against West Indies

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